The Electronic Journal of e-Government publishes perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Government

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Journal Article

Implementing e‑Government Services in East Africa: Assessing Status through Content Analysis of Government Websites  pp39-54

Janet Kaaya

© Jun 2004 Volume 2 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 74

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Abstract

A content analysis study was conducted to determine the status of government websites of three East African countries ‑ Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda ‑ using establishment year, visibility and usability attributes. The results were matched with a four‑stage model of e‑Government growth based on the status of websites from simple to sophisticated features. The study identified 98 government websites including 33 for Kenya, 37 for Tanzania and 28 for Uganda. More than 83% of the identified websites were established between 2000 and 2003 and their creators are still undergoing the learning experience. The website visibility test ranged from 27% to 40% and the average for three countries was 32%. Usability analysis revealed more interactivity features for Tanzanian and Ugandan websites than Kenyan websites. The study concludes that all of the East African websites are at the first and second stages of the website development and corresponding e‑Government services. One of the theoretical and practical implications of the study is a move toward a standardized use of the website evaluation attributes among various researchers to gauge stages of e‑Government implementation. These attributes can also serve as indicators for individual governments to strive toward advanced stages of e‑ Government implementation.

 

Keywords: Website visibility, website usability, website interactivity, East Africa, Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, content analysis

 

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Journal Article

IT Enactment of new Public Management: the Case Study of Health Information Systems in Kenya  pp311-326

Roberta Bernardi

© Dec 2009 Volume 7 Issue 4, ECEG 2009, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp295 - 432

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Abstract

In the last twenty years most African Governments have embarked on health sector reforms sponsored by international partners. Conceived under New Public Management, the majority of these reforms leverage information technology to decentralise hierarchical structures into more information efficient organizations. The paper illustrates the case study of health management information systems in Kenya in order to better understand how the enactment of information technology has influenced the organisational outcome of New Public Management reforms within the health sector in Kenya. The case study provides a longitudinal account of how the adoption and usage of information technology within two health management information systems of Kenya Ministry of Health has affected the implementation of NPM reforms. Data collection and analysis have been framed within an institutionalist perspective viewing different agents acting under the pressure of competing logics (New Public Management and Old Public Administration) at three main levels of action: the macro or policy level (e.g., formal policies), the meso or organisational level (e.g., professional norms and management), and the user or agency level (e.g., IS users' routines). The case study has shown that NPM institutions were not supported by coherent actions unifying all actors involved in the restructuration of health information systems in Kenya so that IT enactment was not consistent across the health information system giving way to structural changes that were not aligned with what was envisaged in the reforms. Findings point to the rhetoric behind certain reform discourses by main actors involved, particularly, at the macro‑policy level. The paper calls for a stronger source of political legitimacy to support discourses around public sector reforms so that through the right competences and systems of values at the meso level information technology can be used as a catalyst for a more consistent implementation of the reforms. New discourses around the potential of IT should be more aligned with certain institutions underpinning the practices of policy makers at the macro level inducing Government echelons to legitimize IT at the macro‑policy level.

 

Keywords: information technology, health information systems, e-Government, new public management, institution theory, Africa, developing countries

 

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Journal Article

Exploring Issues Underlying Citizen Adoption of eGovernment Initiatives in Developing Countries: The Case of Tanzania  pp175-187

Jim Yonazi, Henk Sol, Albert Boonstra

© Dec 2010 Volume 8 Issue 2, ECEG Conference Issue, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp83 - 235

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Abstract

Adoption plays an important role in the success of eGovernment initiatives. Low adoption, particularly by citizens, indicates inadequate utilization and rejection of the initiatives by the intended users. This may lead into failure of eGovernment initiatives. This is particularly important in the context of developing countries such as Tanzania where eGovernment is a newly imported innovation. It is therefore imperative to understand and proactively consider issues underlying citizen adoption of eGovernment initiatives in that context. This study aimed at identifying issues underlying adoption of eGovernment initiatives in Tanzania, a typical developing country. The results are important for designing, deploying, and evaluating of the initiatives in the country. In this paper, we present research results concerning issues influencing adoption of eGovernment initiatives by citizens in Tanzania. Using the case study approach as our strategy, we investigated the adoption of three government organisations. We found that the adoption of eGovernment initiatives in Tanzania is determined by (1) perceived organisational preparedness (2) citizen preparedness (3) service intrinsic issues, (4) access limitations, and (5) organisational context. We perceive that it is possible to achieve higher degree of citizen adoption of eGovernment initiatives in Tanzania. However, the government need appropriate strategies to overcome challenges posed by the issues identified in this study.

 

Keywords: eGovernment, Tanzania, adoption, Africa, developing countries

 

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Journal Article

Challenges to the Successful Implementation of e‑Government Initiatives in Sub‑Saharan Africa: A Literature Review  pp252-266

Quinta Nven-akeng Nkohkwo, M. Sirajul Islam

© Dec 2013 Volume 11 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp181 - 322

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Abstract

Abstract: With the dawn of the technological age due to the wide spread of information and communication technologies (ICTs), e‑government is fast becoming of prime importance. This has prompted many governments (those of Sub‑Saharan African ‑ SSA incl uded) to start thinking of going digital. This growing importance stems from the fact that e‑government has the capability of promoting better governance, transparency, raising service performance and eliminating bottlenecks in the service delivery proce ss. This paper is based on a literature review of the papers and documents relating to e‑government and investigates the challenges to the successful implementation of e‑government initiatives in all the 49 African countries in SSA for the period 2001 to 2012. In order to conduct a systematic review the guidelines suggested by Webster and Watson (2002) and Okoli and Schabram (2010) have been followed. In total 75 relevant articles and documents have been examined all of which have been published in le ading journals, conferences proceedings, reports from governmental and non‑governmental organizations. The results show that ICT infrastructure, human resources, legal framework, Internet access, the digital divide, and connectivity are among the most com mon themes on the challenges to the successful implementation of e‑government initiatives in Sub‑Saharan African countries. These themes are further grouped into six different aspects abbreviated as IF‑POSH (Infrastructural, financial, political, organis ational, socio‑economic and human). Among these six aspects, infrastructural and human aspects are the most important challenges that the respective governments in SSA need to address prior to adopting implementation strategies. The study suggests that g overnments of the Sub‑Saharan African countries can benefit from the advantages of e‑government if they address these challenges collectively allowing for the sensitivity of certain socio‑economic realities.

 

Keywords: Keywords: ICTs, e-government, Sub-Saharan Africa, e-government Challenges, e-government implementation

 

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Journal Article

Public‑Sector Reform, E‑Government and the Search for Excellence in Africa: Experiences from Uganda  pp240-251

Prince Karakire Guma

© Dec 2013 Volume 11 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp181 - 322

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Abstract

Abstract. The traditional portrait of many governments worldwide, synonymous with a massive bureaucratic machinery operating inefficiently, unresponsively and at high cost, is gradually fading. Over the past two or so decades, Sub‑Saharan African countrie s, have witnessed wide‑ranging public‑sector reforms often in search of effective and efficient systems of government. One such reform came in the form of ICT. Driven by the belief that e‑government is one of the key motors to achieve significant leaps ne eded for reform, governments are taking wide‑ranging initiatives to work better. This paper aimed at examining trends in public‑sector reform that lead to contemporary e‑government practice, highlighting experiences from an African country. Using the case study approach, the paper presents a historiographical analysis of public‑sector reforms in Africa, and the role of ICTs in Ugandas quest for efficient and effective systems of administration.

 

Keywords: Keywords: e-government, public-sector reform, excellence, Uganda, Africa

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 7 Issue 4, ECEG 2009 / Dec 2009  pp295‑432

Editor: Frank Bannister

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Keywords: Africa, back-office automation, Brazil, citizens’ participation, developing countries, DOI and emerging economy access, DynaVote, e-government data interoperability, e-Justice, electronic voting, eVoting requirements, Fez e-government, form generation, GIF, goal orientation, governance, health information systems, implementation, information technology, institution theory, integration strategy, intellectual capital, interoperability, Interoperability tool, inter-organizational collaboration, joined-up government, new public management, ontology, perceived risk, practically, public value, records computerization, records management, supply chain management (SCM), TAM, technology acceptance model, trust, web services, WSML/WSMO, XML schema

 

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