The Electronic Journal of e-Government publishes perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Government

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Journal Article

Does the Internet help to overcome social exclusion?  pp139-146

Paul Foley

© Oct 2004 Volume 2 Issue 2, ECEG 2004, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp75 - 146

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Abstract

This paper describes one of the first studies to investigate the take‑up and impact of ICT amongst socially excluded groups. 130 people took part in 20 focus group discussions. The study: Investigated the factors that influence the adoption and use of the Internet by socially excluded groups; Identified tangible economic and social benefits arising from having access and making use of the Internet; Recommends policies and future action concerning the targeting of resources and the design and likely success of current interventions to promote Internet use. The study shows that some clear and quantifiable benefits can arise from Internet access by socially excluded groups. If the level of use of online information is used as a surrogate for beneficial impact amongst socially excluded groups it is apparent that the Internet is not just providing wider opportunities; these opportunities are actively being seized by socially excluded groups.

 

Keywords: Social exclusion, digital divide, Internet use, policy impact, benefits of ICT

 

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Journal Article

Bridging the Digital Divide for e‑Government inclusion: A United States Case Study  pp109-118

Janice C. Sipior, Burke T. Ward

© Dec 2005 Volume 3 Issue 3, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp99 - 156

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Abstract

This case study of computer‑illiterate people in a public housing community was undertaken to explore the digital divide and e‑Government inclusion and uses. Overall, the results indicate the importance of a community organizing strategy to secure internet access, coordinate education and training, and sustain internet use to initiate e‑ Government participation among the techno‑disadvantaged. While first‑time government website visitation by community participants was surprisingly high, the intent to continue use was lacking. Sustained use remains challenging due to external threats to the community initiative, including isolation from mainstream society, exploitive dependency by those ostensibly assisting the community, and a culture of failure. Public outreach, on the part of governmental and other organizations, is suggested to encourage e‑Government inclusion among those previously excluded.

 

Keywords: e-Government, digital divide, country case study, internet access

 

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Journal Article

A Social Perspective on Implementation of e‑Government — a Longitudinal Study at the County Administration of Sweden  pp49-60

Kerstin Grundén

© Jan 2009 Volume 7 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 122

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Abstract

A longitudinal study of implementation of e‑Government at the County Administration of Sweden was analysed and discussed from a social perspective. Two interview studies at the legal and traffic departments were compared. Interviews were made with decision makers, handling officers and administrative assistants focussing on social consequences of work situations, work processes and quality of e‑services to the clients. The MOA‑model was used as a frame of reference for the study. According to the analysis, coping and sense making strategies by the respondents increased. e‑Government made demands for new competencies for employees and clients. Internal and external digital divides are social consequences of the implementation of e‑services. Management increased their focus on efficiency aspects related to e‑Government. There is a need to integrate competence of social aspects into the development process of e‑Government. The users were aware of the importance of social aspects of IT implementation. There is a need for competence development of social consequences related to IT implementation also for development personnel and different interest groups.

 

Keywords: Implementation, e-Government, digital divide, social consequences, coping and sense making strategies

 

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Journal Article

Citizen‑centric Perspective on the Adoption of E‑Government in the Philippines  pp63-83

Aldwin Uy Urbina, Naoya Abe

© Mar 2017 Volume 15 Issue 2, Editor: Carl Erik Moe, pp57 - 154

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Abstract

Information and communications technologies (ICTs) and the Internet are widely used as strategic means to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of governments and the accessibility of government information and services to citizens. In the Philippines, the government has prepared elaborate plans to enhance implementation of e‑government in the country. Thus, it is only fitting to investigate the state of the adoption of e‑government in the country not only to monitor progress of its implementation but to further improve access of citizens to government information and services. However, due to the inherent disparities in socio‑demography, access to ICTs, Internet use as well as in the patterns of Internet use, and awareness of available e‑government services in developing countries such as the Philippines, the adoption of e‑government by citizens in the country is faced with major challenges (e.g., inequitable access to information and government services, widening of the gap between advantaged and disadvantaged groups). In order to uncover the state of adoption and citizens’ perception of e‑government in the Philippines, this study analyzed primary data collected through a national‑scale survey conducted as a result of collaboration with a private social research institution based in the Philippines. Descriptive and inferential statistics were employed to describe the state of adoption of e‑government in the Philippines and examine the effects of socio‑demographic factors; access to ICTs and the Internet; and attitudes toward e‑government on the awareness and adoption of e‑government in the country. The study further validates the findings of other empirical studies on e‑government adoption found in literature.

 

Keywords: online public services, digital divide, logistic regression analysis

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 3 Issue 3 / Nov 2005  pp99‑156

Editor: Frank Bannister

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Keywords: electronic journal, papers, articles, eGovernment, electronic government, eGovernment methods, eGovernment studies, e-Government, Accessibility guidelines, Administration, Administrative workflows, Benchmarking, Citizen interaction, Country case study, Diffusion, Digital divide, e-Government, e-Procurement, Institutions, Internet access, Inter-organizational systems, Legal constraints, Measuring e-Government, Municipalities, Mutual aid, Non-conforming case, Policy, Public process modeling, Public sector, Slovenia, Tools, Web style guide, Web testing and evaluation and assistive technology

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 3 Issue 4 / Dec 2005  pp157‑240

Editor: Frank Bannister

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Keywords: electronic journal, papers, articles, eGovernment, electronic government, eGovernment methods, eGovernment studies, e-Government, Accessibility guidelines, Administration, Administrative workflows, Benchmarking, Citizen interaction, Country case study, Diffusion, Digital divide, e-Government, e-Procurement, Institutions, Internet access, Inter-organizational systems, Legal constraints, Measuring e-Government, Municipalities, Mutual aid, Non-conforming case, Policy, Public process modeling, Public sector, Slovenia, Tools, Web style guide, Web testing and evaluation and assistive technology

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 7 Issue 1 / Jan 2009  pp1‑122

Editor: Frank Bannister

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Keywords: accessibility, barriers, BRAIN, business process, business rule, capacity for getting ahead, citizen participation, community building, coping and sense making strategies, developing nations, digital divide, disability, disenfranchisement, eDemocracy, e-governance, e-Government adoption, e-government readiness, Egypt, end-user approaches, e-readiness, information and communication technology, information dissemination, internet voting, IT transfer, KedaiKom, Malaysia, municipalities, policy participation, political participation, public participation, public sector, public servants, Section 508, service delivery, social and digital inclusion, social consequences, social participation, strategic planning, Switzerland, technology acceptance model, Telecentres, turnout, websites

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 15 Issue 2 / Mar 2017  pp57‑154

Editor: Carl Erik Moe

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Editorial

Chief Editor

carl erik moe Dr Carl Erik Moe  is a Professor of Information Systems at the University of Agder, Norway. After serving as Head of Department (HOD) for a number of years, he is back to research and teaching. As HOD he took a leading role developing graduate programs in both Information Systems and Health Informatics, and PhD program in Information Systems as well as promoting and generating research collaboration with local government and industry.

Carl Erik has served as Program Chair of IFIP EGOV 2012. He is an active reviewer for several academic journals. He was one of the founding members of the Scandinavian Workshop on e‑Government, of which he is still very much involved and he has served as leader of the Norwegian Council for Information Science.

Carl Erik’s current research interests include e‑Government covering issues such as Procurement of IS and Policies and Strategies for Digital Government including Open Government and ICT4D, and it includes e‑Health covering issues such as IS in Social Work, Telecare and Information Systems in Integrated Care.

Carl Erik served as Associate Editor on EJEG for several years before taking over as Editor. He welcomes both empirical and conceptual work and case studies with practical implications, and he encourages work on emerging topics and open and smart government. His ambition is to keep up the good academic quality of the journal at the same time as encouraging work in progress and establishing a case section in the journal.

 

Keywords: online public services, digital divide, logistic regression analysis, Enterprise Architecture, Public Sector, Systematic Literature Review, Government Enterprise Architecture, Technology Acceptance, e-procurement, survey, private firms, Belgium, Social Sensors, Open Governance, Crowdsourcing, e-participation, Trust, Information Quality, Organizational performance, E-government, Qualitative research, Kuwait, Arab World

 

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