The Electronic Journal of e-Government publishes perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Government
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Journal Article

MIDEM. Models for Interactive Decision Making  pp55-64

Auli Keskinen

© Jun 2004 Volume 2 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 74

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Abstract

This article is a broad reflection on e‑Democracy models used in several countries throughout the last 20 years. It is based on hands‑on experience gained through experiments and projects with local authorities conducted since the days of videotex. In essence, ICT can be utilised to radically transform the shape of political decision making into a citizen‑oriented vision. The realisation of this vision must involve the participation of people and continuous deliberation between citizens and political decision makers. Although e‑Democracy is considered a way for creating genuine dialogue between interest groups in a society in the future, the technology needs motivated communities to ensure self‑ governance is developed. If used properly ICT will transform our understanding of political action.

 

Keywords: e-Democracy, decision making, ICT, deliberative poll, televote, electronic town meeting, funnel model, citizen jury, referendum

 

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Journal Article

Using the New Institutional Economics in e‑Government to deliver transformational change  pp127-138

Andy Ellis

© Oct 2004 Volume 2 Issue 2, ECEG 2004, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp75 - 146

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Abstract

e‑Government puts demands on government organisations which may require new management frameworks. This paper presents interim findings from a doctoral research study exploring how a framework based on the New Institutional Economics leads to greater understanding and new insights. This paper, which outlines the theory and shows how it has been applied as a practical business tool in an e‑government context, updates the paper presented at the 2004 European Conference on e‑Government.

 

Keywords: Institutional economics, e-Government, transformational change, ICT, education

 

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Journal Article

Factors Affecting the Successful Implementation of ICT Projects in Government  pp175-184

David Gichoya

© Feb 2006 Volume 3 Issue 4, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp157 - 240

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Abstract

A government is a huge and complex organisation, whose operations and strategic focus could be greatly enhanced by the well focussed application of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) to support improvements in productivity, management effectiveness and ultimately, the quality of services offered to citizens. While the benefits of ICT in government cannot be disputed, there are several concerns about its success as well as the strategies to be adopted in implementation of systems in various countries. In this paper, the characteristic challenges that developing nations face, which make ICT implementation in government fail to succeed are identified and synthesised. The paper presents results of literature review of case studies from both developed and developing countries and preliminary studies grounded in the Kenya e‑Government reality. The key factors are identified, synthesised and categorised under common broad categories. This results in a rich picture of ICT implementation experience that helps to identify possible solutions. A descriptive framework for categorising key factors in ICT implementation in government illustrated with references to the literature is proposed. The input variables are categorised into factors for success (drivers and enablers), and factors for failure (barriers and inhibitors). The output variables are categorized into organisational and technological benefits. Finally, an action for success is proposed. This action includes suggestions for increasing the impact of factors for success while reducing the impact of factors for failure and use of available good practice.

 

Keywords: Government informatics, ICT projects implementation, e-Government, information system, ICT success and failure

 

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Journal Article

Information‑and Communication Technology (ICT) and Local Power Relationships: An Impact Assessment  pp231-240

Philipp Zimmermann, Matthias Finge

© Feb 2006 Volume 3 Issue 4, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp157 - 240

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Abstract

This paper is grounded in the empirical reality of a growing use of information‑ and communication technologies (ICTs) in public administrations. Generally, ICTs are being introduced in an organization in order to increase operational efficiency, quality, and transparency. But, besides these intended effects, the introduction of ICTs also leads to substantial changes in the power relationships among all involved actors. As a result of ICT‑enhanced operations, some of the actors will increase their power, while others will loose some of their power. This paper therefore studies the implications of ICTs on the power relations in local administration settings.

 

Keywords: Information and communication technology, ICT, local administration, power relationships, stakeholder theory, state transformation, electronic governance

 

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Journal Article

e‑Government Leaders, Organisational Change and ICTs: Learning from FAME and other e‑Government Experiences  pp11-20

James Carr, Pat Gannon-Leary

© Aug 2007 Volume 5 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 95

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Abstract

So‑called 'slow' adaptation to technological change is actually a characteristic of major innovations, particularly those requiring significant organisational change. The implementation of ICT to support government sector working is no exception: it is a complex socio‑technical practice comprised of interrelated technical, cultural and organisational issues. As part of the "Framework for Multi‑Agency Environments" (FAME: www.fame‑uk.org) project interviews were conducted with leaders of e‑government projects and with project managers responsible for local authority FAME strands. How far do leadersmanagers think in terms of organisational change and what technology can do to help that objective, and how far do they think about the opportunities for organisational change that ICT developments might enable? Grounded theory method (GTM) is used in the context of local authority leadership to explore these issues.

 

Keywords: e-government leaders, organisational change, ICT, socio-technical practice, FAME, innofusion

 

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Journal Article

A Content Analysis of Selected Government Web Sites: a Case Study of Nepal  pp88-95

Jitendra Parajuli

© Aug 2007 Volume 5 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 95

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Abstract

This study evaluated the ministerial Web sites of Government of Nepal to project the overall impression of government Web sites in Nepal. It was found that of the twenty ministries only seventeen ministries (85 percent) had dedicated Web sites and provided information and, in some cases, downloadable digital forms that could be filled in and submitted offline. However, the study focused on the content of the sites crucial for citizen‑government interaction. Since the Web content evaluation metrics are not completely exhaustive, this study based the Web analysis on four determinants ‑ transparency, interactivity, accessibility, and usability ‑ and evaluated all the ministerial Web sites. It was found that Web features that are critical in fostering government openness, government‑government communication, and citizen participation and satisfaction are still infrequent or completely absent in the ministerial Web sites. The study suggests that the government needs to cultivate standards for its Web site design exploit the benefits offered by information and communication technologies to promote good governance through electronic government. The government should also continuously evolve the site design techniques to meet citizens' expectations.

 

Keywords: e-Government, digital government, Nepal, web site contents, web site analysis, ICT, developing country

 

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Journal Article

An e‑Government Stages of Growth Model Based on Research Within the Irish Revenue Offices  pp415-424

Finn de Brí

© Dec 2009 Volume 7 Issue 4, ECEG 2009, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp295 - 432

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Abstract

This paper describes a stages of growth model for e‑Government. The proposed model is comprised of seven stages, which are divided into three phases. The model is based on research into and analysis of Information Systems and Information Communications Technology (ICT) solutions in the Irish Revenue Offices for more than a 50‑year period. It is argued that this model provides a useful template for understanding the growth of ICT in government organisations.

 

Keywords: stages of growth, e-government, learning organisation, ICT, IT evolutionary models, IT maturity

 

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Journal Article

Case Study: e‑Youth City Council Project an Alternative e‑Government for Young People  pp349-360

Gemma Gibert i Font

© Dec 2009 Volume 7 Issue 4, ECEG 2009, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp295 - 432

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Abstract

This article presents an explanatory analysis of an e‑ Youth City Council project held in the town of Sant Andreu de Llavaneres, Catalonia, during the year 2008. The main objectives of this programme were to increase citizen participation, improve good governance and through it, the possibility of consolidating and strengthening democracy by ICT use. This case study was based on a survey of 628 young people aged between 14 and 18. The aim was to motivate and enable them to play an active role in politics and to take up positions of genuine authority and responsibility, within local decision making, as pre‑voting citizens. In this way, the young people engaged to develop all stages of the electoral process, participated in an e‑voting system and were empowered in local government for 15 days. In this case polity was translated into practice and created a successful partnership between young citizens and the local political parties. The focus of this ICT research was, basically, which tools the youngsters used and the influence it had on electorate participation In this way, the ICT acquired a new perspective relating to this study group who are considered a generation raised in a computerised era and who are leaders in the fields of innovation and communication, used as a common tool in their social life and work. The analysis is described and evaluated by explanatory variables such as; population, age, ICT use and access, number of voters and abstentions, the ajuntamentjove.cat website , political party blogs, electoral campaign spots and meetings, the electronic voting system and finally the video " Youth Government Constitution" broadcast by internet into the school classroom. Electronic voting has been incorporated as a pilot test, consisting of a voting system of closed lists with a choice of up to two preferential candidates.

 

Keywords: e-government, young citizens, participation, ICT, democracy and policy, e-voting

 

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