The Electronic Journal of e-Government publishes perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Government

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Journal Article

Does the Internet help to overcome social exclusion?  pp139-146

Paul Foley

© Oct 2004 Volume 2 Issue 2, ECEG 2004, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp75 - 146

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Abstract

This paper describes one of the first studies to investigate the take‑up and impact of ICT amongst socially excluded groups. 130 people took part in 20 focus group discussions. The study: Investigated the factors that influence the adoption and use of the Internet by socially excluded groups; Identified tangible economic and social benefits arising from having access and making use of the Internet; Recommends policies and future action concerning the targeting of resources and the design and likely success of current interventions to promote Internet use. The study shows that some clear and quantifiable benefits can arise from Internet access by socially excluded groups. If the level of use of online information is used as a surrogate for beneficial impact amongst socially excluded groups it is apparent that the Internet is not just providing wider opportunities; these opportunities are actively being seized by socially excluded groups.

 

Keywords: Social exclusion, digital divide, Internet use, policy impact, benefits of ICT

 

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Journal Article

Impacts of Internet use on Public Administration: A Case Study of the Brazilian Tax Administration  pp49-58

Maria Virginia de Vasconcellos, Maria das Graças Rua

© Jul 2005 Volume 3 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 58

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Abstract

This paper seeks to identify the effects of Internet used as a vehicle for sending federal tax returns through the RECEITANET program. The benefits that came out from security and costs reduction in the process of delivering tax returns are identified, as well as the impacts on Tax Administration (TA) and on the Treasury‑Taxpayer relationship.

 

Keywords: E-Government, G2C-Government to Citizen service, E-public service, IT application in Tax Administration, Transmitting Tax returns via Internet, Treasury-Taxpayer relationship, IT Evaluation

 

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Journal Article

Bridging the Digital Divide for e‑Government inclusion: A United States Case Study  pp109-118

Janice C. Sipior, Burke T. Ward

© Dec 2005 Volume 3 Issue 3, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp99 - 156

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Abstract

This case study of computer‑illiterate people in a public housing community was undertaken to explore the digital divide and e‑Government inclusion and uses. Overall, the results indicate the importance of a community organizing strategy to secure internet access, coordinate education and training, and sustain internet use to initiate e‑ Government participation among the techno‑disadvantaged. While first‑time government website visitation by community participants was surprisingly high, the intent to continue use was lacking. Sustained use remains challenging due to external threats to the community initiative, including isolation from mainstream society, exploitive dependency by those ostensibly assisting the community, and a culture of failure. Public outreach, on the part of governmental and other organizations, is suggested to encourage e‑Government inclusion among those previously excluded.

 

Keywords: e-Government, digital divide, country case study, internet access

 

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Journal Article

A Suggested Framework for Assessing Electronic Government Readiness in Egypt  pp11-28

Nahed Amin Azab, Sherif Kamel, Georgios Dafoulas

© Jan 2009 Volume 7 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 122

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Abstract

Electronic Government (e‑Government) is becoming a global phenomenon that is increasingly attracting the attention of community citizens including politicians, economists, decision and policy makers amongst others. Once only regarded as a means for modernizing the public sector and increasing government productivity and efficiency, e‑ Government is presently recognized as a driver and a key enabler of citizen‑centric, cooperative, and seamless modern governance implying not only a profound transformation in the way government interacts with the governed but also the reinvention of its internal processes and how organizations carry their business both internally as well as externally while interacting with the other segments of the community. Based on the literature, it is frequently claimed that the availability of an effective e‑Government assessment framework is a necessary condition for advancing e‑Government proper implementation. The objective of this article is to develop an e‑Government appraisal framework encompassing several components such as people, technology, processes, and strategic planning. The article examines the relations and interactions of these components in an emerging e‑Government environment using a case study on an agency affiliated to the government of Egypt as a primary step in the process of testing the framework presented.

 

Keywords: government e-Government e-Government readiness e-readiness internet strategic planning information and communication technology public sector IT transfer developing nations Egypt

 

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Journal Article

Building on Success: The Diffusion of e‑Government in the American States  pp71-82

Hyun Jung Yun, Cynthia Opheim

© Mar 2010 Volume 8 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 82

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Abstract

The purpose of this study is to determine what factors encourage the diffusion of Internet technology, or e‑government, in the American states. Different dimensions of digital technology are examined by investigating the spread of both e‑service and e‑democracy. A longitudinal mixed linear model is used to test the direct effects of states' political, economic, demographic, and ideological factors on the states' efforts to adopt Internet technology over the first seven years of the new millennium. The results indicate that the adoption of Internet technology is a cumulative process; a state's preexisting digitalization is continuously built on progress in expanding the governmental digital services and outreach. States whose leaders are engaged in professional networks are more likely to adopt e‑government. Institutionally powerful governors also encourage the adoption of on‑line technology. The study concludes that the spread of Internet technology in providing services and expanding outreach fits the explanatory analysis of noncontroversial policies that are diffused by a process of emulation. Executive power, leadership, and professional networks reinforce this pattern of emulation.

 

Keywords: e-government, e-service, e-democracy, internet technology, emulation, leadership, professional networks

 

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Journal Article

Online Transparency for Accountability: One Assessing Model and two Applications  pp279-291

Rui Pedro Lourenço

© Dec 2013 Volume 11 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp181 - 322

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Abstract

Abstract: This paper proposes, in the context of Open Government, a model to assess how public sector entities are taking advantage of the Internet as an information disclosure tool and a means to promote transparency, specifically in what concerns the us e of public resources (input transparency for accountability). The assessment model and resulting Transparency Index gives particular attention to the disclosure of detailed (disaggregated) data according to the principles of Open Government Data, nam ely by valuing data visibility, adequate format for further processing, and the autonomous presentation of individual information items. Subsequently, the paper demonstrates the applicability of the proposed model by carrying out two assessment exercises on two subsets of Portuguese and Italian municipalities. Results show that, all in all, the municipalities analysed do not yet disclose enough information useful for accountability processes and they do not take advantage of the Internet potential to make the data provided more visible and re‑usable by citizens and local stakeholders. Alone, high‑level policy directives, governmental requirements and national legislation guaranteeing access to information are not enough to ensure public entities (municip alities in particular) disclose all the relevant data, and therefore specific guidelines are needed.

 

Keywords: Keywords: Accountability, Input transparency assessment, Internet, Open Government

 

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Journal Article

Perceptions of the Australian public towards mobile internet e‑voting: risks, choice and trust  pp117-134

Phillip Zada, Greg Falzon, Paul Kwan

© Jun 2016 Volume 14 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 134

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Abstract

This paper reports on data collected from an anonymous survey on perceptions of the Australian public towards using a mobile internet e‑voting platform (N = 295). It is the first such study conducted in an Australian context by an academic institution, which allows this research to be approached with a sense of impartiality. Our society has become rapidly fuelled by the mobilization of interactions and services. As the society becomes increasingly wirelessly connected, these mobile platforms are expecte d to provide an untapped universal medium by which paper based elections can be complemented or even "upgraded" to digital elections. This research is the first paper in a study which will be focusing on internet e‑voting, specifically the utilisation of mobility devices within Australia. As with any research, context shapes the direction and outcome goals. Internet e‑Voting (and research pertaining to) has gained momentum over recent years. Though there has been much research done in this field, there was been a gap in findings when dealing with Australian and mobility context, however similarities can be drawn from these related studies. The way the Australian context differentiates itself in one instance is Compulsory Voting. Utilising the findings f rom this initial study, we intend to provide a baseline from which our research can be further analysed and in turn will allow the derivation of hypotheses leading to creation of a user acceptance model towards utilisation of a mobile internet e‑voting pl atform during an Australian election. Survey respondents were overall more in favour of using mobile internet e‑voting (75.25%), with more respondents requiring greater information about the technology (15.93%) rather than being against its use (8.82 %). The top appeals of the platform were towards mobility (91.40%), verifiability (72.90%) and speed (72.50%), with the top concerns towards manipulation (75.10%), retrieval (65.30%) and monitoring (63.20%) of casted votes by malicious partie s or software. The initial hypothesis that were derived from the c

 

Keywords: Mobile Voting, Remote internet e-voting, Voting/election technologies, E-government, Online Voting, Electronic Voting Survey

 

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Journal Article

The Risk of e‑Voting  pp169-178

Thomas W. Lauer

© Oct 2004 Volume 2 Issue 3, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp147 - 218

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Abstract

World wide, there are various proposals for automating manual voting processes. This paper considers two different e‑voting schemes, Internet voting and direct recording electronic (DRE) voting systems, explicitly focusing on risk to the integrity of the voting process. Fair elections must assure voter authentication, vote confidentiality and integrity, and the ability to audit the election. E‑voting poses special challenges. The paper analyzes security risks that may threaten e‑voting schemes and makes recommendations.

 

Keywords: Internet voting, e-voting, direct recording electronic voting, IS security, risk analysis, voter fraud

 

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