The Electronic Journal of e-Government publishes perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Government

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Journal Article

e‑Participation and Governance: Widening the net  pp39-48

Lee Komito

© Jul 2005 Volume 3 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 58

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Abstract

As a solution to declining political and civic participation, many governments are seeking to increase the number of citizens who participate in policy‑making and governance. Contrary to early expectations, recent research suggests that new information and communications technologies (ICTs) may not increase participation rates in formal organisations, and so may not improve participation rates. The Mobhaile project in Ireland is an example of a local government initiative which combines service provision ('e‑government') functions and facilities for voluntary, community and business organisations that enhance social capital in local communities, while also enabling civic participation functions ('e‑ governance'), in a single web‑based geographical interface. Such projects enable citizens to access government services and encourages them, as part of this process, to also participate in local activities that build social capital in the community. The resulting mix can be an effective basis for greater political and civic participation.

 

Keywords: eInclusion, eParticipation, community politics, Ireland, governance, social capital

 

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Journal Article

Transformational aspects of e‑Government in Ireland: Issues to be addressed  pp22-30

Orla O'Donnell, Richard Boyle, Virpi Timonen

© Mar 2003 Volume 1 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 62

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Abstract

Drawing upon Irish experience, this paper explores some of the key issues to be addressed in using e‑Government effectively to transform public sector organisations. Two case studies are detailed:ROS (Revenue Online Service) and Integrated Service Centres (County Donegal). Policy implications of developments to date and remaining challenges are discussed

 

Keywords: Ireland, e-Government, Concepts, Organisational Transformation, Policy

 

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Journal Article

Predictive Analytics in the Public Sector: Using Data Mining to Assist Better Target Selection for Audit  pp132-140

Duncan Cleary

© Dec 2011 Volume 9 Issue 2, ECEG, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp93 - 222

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Abstract

Revenue, the Irish Tax and Customs Authority, has been developing the use of data mining techniques as part of a process of putting analytics at the core of its business processes. Recent data mining projects, which have been piloted successfully, have de veloped predictive models to assist in the better targeting of taxpayers for possible non‑compliance/ tax evasion, and liquidation. The models aim, for example, to predict the likelihood of a case yielding in the event of an intervention, such as an audit . Evaluation cases have been worked in the field and the hit rate was approximately 75%. In addition, all audits completed by Revenue in the year after the models had been created were assessed using the model probability to yield score, and a significant correlation exists between the expected and actual outcome of the audits. The models are now being developed further, and are in full production in 2011. Critical factors for model success include rigorous statistical analyses, good data quality, softwar e, teamwork, timing, resources and consistent case profiling/ treatments. The models are developed using SAS Enterprise Miner and SAS Enterprise Guide. This work is a good example of the applicability of tools developed for one purpose (e.g. Credit Scori ng for Banking and Insurance) having multiple other potential applications. This paper shows how the application of advanced analytics can add value to the work of Tax and Customs authorities, by leveraging existing data in a robust and flexible way to r educe costs by better targeting cases for interventions. Analytics can thus greatly support the business to make better‑informed decisions.

 

Keywords: tax, predictive analytics, data mining, public sector, Ireland

 

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