The Electronic Journal of e-Government publishes perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Government

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Journal Article

Turkish Local e‑Governments: a Longitudinal Study  pp95-106

Aykut Arslan

© Dec 2007 Volume 5 Issue 2, ECEG 2007, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp95 - 224

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Abstract

This article is based on a longitudinal exploratory study of the Turkish local e‑governments between September 2005 and December 2006. 3,228 Turkish local governments constitute the sampling framework of this paper. The first part of the study, which took place in 2005, indicated that only 969 authorities were online. But the second part, issued at the end of 2006, showed that 1,591 units were online. The purpose of the second study was to explore the degree of change and how this change occurs in a certain time line among those authorities. Despite some theoretical studies in this field, no research was held on local e‑governments, particularly, in a longitudinal dimension in Turkey. That's why this study is unique in terms of covering the overall picture of the local activity on the topic of e‑government.

 

Keywords: Turkish e-governments, e-Government, Turkish local e-governments, e-Government, e-municipality, eadministration, Turkish local governments, e-Turkey

 

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Journal Article

E‑government Policy Formation … Understanding the roles of change drivers, veto players and advocacy coalitions  pp130-140

William Linnefell, Anette Hallin, Mikael Lagergren

© Dec 2014 Volume 12 Issue 2, ECEG 2014, Editor: Frank Banister, pp95 - 207

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Abstract

Abstract: Despite its promise of increasing public authorities effectiveness, improving decision making and service delivery, e‑government initiatives too often fail. So far, reasons for this have largely been sought in technological aspects of e‑governm ent. However, e‑government is much more complex than that; e‑government also encompasses aspects related to the inner workingsŽ of organizations, policy formation processes and change management. Based on an in‑depth case study of an e‑government policy formation process in the municipality of Vasteras, Sweden, this paper sets out to develop the understanding of e‑government policy failure by elucidating how individuals actions, behaviors and decision affect endeavors to improve e‑government policy agen das. Applying theoretical concepts from political science and the change management literature, this paper describes how a change driver attempted to accomplish fundamental changes in the policy area of e‑government, through involving as many stakeholder s as possible in the policy formation process, and how this enabled for the emergence of a new advocacy coalition. This advocacy coalition consisted of the actors involved in the policy formation process, and these actors espoused the policy belief advoca ted by the change driver. However, as time went by, it became apparent that there also existed several veto players, which the change driver failed to engage, and who actively blocked the attempt to get the new policy documents on e‑government adopted. A s a consequence, the policy formation process failed, despite that the municipality of Vasteras had exceptionally good conditions for improving the e‑government policy agenda. This case study highlights the need for e‑government‑research to look beyond th eoretical areas of technological science, and it illustrates the usefulness of theories from political science and change management when furthering the knowledge of e‑government. It also points to the need for more processual studies on policy formation processes.

 

Keywords: Keywords: e-government, policy formation process, the municipality of Vasteras, veto players, advocacy coalitions, change processes, change drivers

 

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Journal Article

A Critical Analysis of E‑government Evaluation Models at National and Local Municipal Levels  pp28-42

Dalal Ibrahem Zahran, Hana Abdullah Al-Nuaim, Malcolm John Rutter, David Benyon

© Nov 2015 Volume 13 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 76

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Abstract

Abstract: The importance of e‑government models lies in their offering a basis to measure and guide e‑government. There is still no agreement on how to assess a government online. Most of the e‑government models are not based on research, nor are they validated. In most countries, e‑government has not reached higher stages of growth. Several scholars have shown a confusing picture of e‑government. What is lacking is an in‑depth analysis of e‑government models. Responding to the need for such an analysis, this study identifies the strengths and weaknesses of major national and local e‑government evaluation models. The common limitations of most models are focusing on the government and not the citizen, missing qualitative measures, constructing the e‑equivalent of a bureaucratic administration, and defining general criteria without sufficient validations. In addition, this study has found that the metrics defined for national e‑government are not suitable for municipalities, and most of the existing studies have focused on national e‑governments even though local ones are closer to citizens. There is a need for developing a good theoretical model for both national and local municipal e‑government.

 

Keywords: Keywords: E-government, Municipality, E-government Evaluation Models, Web Evaluation, Usability, Citizen-centric Websites

 

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Journal Article

Degree of Digitalization and Citizen Satisfaction: A Study of the Role of Local e‑Government in Sweden  pp59-71

Irene Bernhard, Livia Norström, Ulrika Lundh Snis, Urban Gråsjö, Martin Gellerstedt

© May 2018 Volume 16 Issue 1, Editor: Dr Carl Erik Moe, pp1 - 86

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Abstract

The aim was to investigate whether there is a relationship between degree of e‑government in Swedish municipalities and perceived satisfaction among citizens generally. This is a large‑scale quantitative study based on valid and reliable Swedish national surveys. Based on these surveys, a new comprehensive index for measuring “degree of digitalization” was constructed. Citizen satisfaction was measured using established indices covering three dimensions: satisfaction with living in the municipality, satisfaction with performance of government activities (delivered services), and satisfaction with transparency and influence. The results show that there is a relationship between the degree of digitalization in a municipality and the perceived satisfaction among its citizens. The degree of digitalization is related to all three dimensions of citizen satisfaction. Additionally, this study indicates that the strength of this relationship is in parity with or even stronger than the relationship between citizen satisfaction and other crucial factors such as educational level and median income.

 

Keywords: degree of digitalization, satisfied citizens, local e-government, municipality, Sweden

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 5 Issue 2, ECEG 2007 / Dec 2007  pp95‑224

Editor: Frank Bannister

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Editorial

This issue contains a selection of the best papers from the 2007 European Conference on e‑Government which took place in The Hague . Our host was Den Haagse Hogeschool, which is housed in a building which can best be described as a series of large ellipses piled on top of one another. Finding a given room on a given level involved a decision as to whether to go clockwise or anticlockwise round this structure and there was plenty of empirical evidence of the validity of the *buttered toast law as the later one was for a presentation, the more likely one seemed to be to go the longer way around.

As usual with this issue, there are a large number of articles and they come from many countries. A number of contributors consider various aspects of government portals and on‑line services. Aykut Arslan looks at the impact of ICT on local government in Turkey , concluding that although progress has been made, there is much to be done, especially in moving beyond efficiency to broader goals of inclusion and democracy. On the other side of the continent, Karin Furuli and Sigrun Kongsrud compare and contrast government portals in Demark and Norway . The framework that they develop for doing this may be of interest to other researchers and has wide potential application. In their article, Ralph Feenstra, Marijn Janssen and René Wagenaar (who sadly died in 2007), examine the question of composition methods for web based government services where there are multiple actors. Composition is the process of combining several services (usually from different suppliers) necessary for the completion of a single task and evaluating methods of doing this is non trivial. Regina Connolly's article focuses on the factors that influence the take up and effectiveness of Ireland 's Revenue Online Service tax payment system and provides several useful insights that could be applied elsewhere. Alea Fairchild and Bruno de Vuyst consider another aspect of government service, the Belgian Government Interoperability Framework (BELGIF) and look at the problems of interoperability in a country with its own particular administrative and political complexities.

Document management is a topic that to date has received little attention in the e‑government literature. Two papers here contribute to making up for this deficiency. For anybody who would like a primer as well as an interesting model, the article by Raphael Kunis, Gudula Rünger and Michael Schwind is an informative read. Mitja Decman also considers the matter of government documents, this time from the perspective of archiving and long term storage. As well as being another good overview of the issues involved, the case for having confidence in such forms of storage is well argued.

The conference has always attracted a number of contributions on electronic voting and e‑democracy In their article, Orhan and Deniz Cetinkaya give a sweeping overview of e‑voting, arguing that there is sometimes a lack of clarity in terminology and suggesting that appropriate levels of verification and validation should be applied to e‑voting in different situations. Mark Liptrott's article on e‑voting presents a rather different perspective, examining the successes and failures of the 2003 e‑voting experiment in the UK . His conclusion is that government will need to be proactive and learn the lessons of Roger's diffusion theory if it is going to get widespread public acceptance of this technology. In a different part of the e‑democracy forest, Jenny Backhouse arrives as a somewhat similar conclusion, that engagement with e‑democracy in Australia seeks unlikely to break out spontaneously with given models. Using analogies from e‑business, she concludes, however, that e‑democracy is here to stay whether we like it or not!

Finally, two papers with broader themes. Albert Meijer opens his article with the provocative question; “Are all countries heading for similar political systems in the information age?” He then looks at this question using empirical research in the USA and The Netherlands which suggests that convergence is not happening in quite the way some expect. Mary Griffiths looks at something quite different, the South Australian Oxygen programme (designed to connect the X and Y generations) which seeks to equip young people for civil engagement via electronic media. The results of this experiment are refreshingly positive and again, as in other articles in this issue, there are lessons for a wider world.

 

Keywords: archiving, Australia, Borger.dk, citizen portal, collaboration, diffusion, digital archive, digital preservation, document management systems, document processing, e-administration, e-business model, e-democracy, e-government security, electronic data, electronic record management, e-municipality, e-participation, e-Turkey, evaluation, e-voting, hierarchical government processes, institutional differences, interoperability, multi-actor networks, Mypage, online public services, outsourcing, peer-managed intranets, pilot scheme, political accountability, Protocols, public policy process, public value, quality of service, record keeping, SERVQUAL, social value, standards, taxation, Transferability, trust, Turkish e-governments, Turkish local governments, UGC, validation, verification, virtual village, web service composition

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 16 Issue 1 / May 2018  pp1‑86

Editor: Dr Carl Erik Moe

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Keywords: ICT4D, Capability Approach, Design-reality gap, ICT4D evaluation, ICT4D champion, Jigawa ICT, economic empowerment, information infrastructure, e-government, implementation, public-private partnership (PPP), least developed countries (LDCs), sub-Saharan Africa, Rwanda, Social media, Social media-based collaboration, Government challenges, Government requirements, Citizen engagement, Two-way communication, Citizens-government relationship, enterprise architecture (EA), adoption, organisational change, resistance towards EA, relevant EA goals, EA practices in use, survey research, degree of digitalization, satisfied citizens, local e-government, municipality, Sweden, E-government, User Participation, Public e-service development

 

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