The Electronic Journal of e-Government publishes perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Government

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Journal Article

Implementing e‑Government Services in East Africa: Assessing Status through Content Analysis of Government Websites  pp39-54

Janet Kaaya

© Jun 2004 Volume 2 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 74

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Abstract

A content analysis study was conducted to determine the status of government websites of three East African countries ‑ Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda ‑ using establishment year, visibility and usability attributes. The results were matched with a four‑stage model of e‑Government growth based on the status of websites from simple to sophisticated features. The study identified 98 government websites including 33 for Kenya, 37 for Tanzania and 28 for Uganda. More than 83% of the identified websites were established between 2000 and 2003 and their creators are still undergoing the learning experience. The website visibility test ranged from 27% to 40% and the average for three countries was 32%. Usability analysis revealed more interactivity features for Tanzanian and Ugandan websites than Kenyan websites. The study concludes that all of the East African websites are at the first and second stages of the website development and corresponding e‑Government services. One of the theoretical and practical implications of the study is a move toward a standardized use of the website evaluation attributes among various researchers to gauge stages of e‑Government implementation. These attributes can also serve as indicators for individual governments to strive toward advanced stages of e‑ Government implementation.

 

Keywords: Website visibility, website usability, website interactivity, East Africa, Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, content analysis

 

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Journal Article

Evaluation of E‑Government Implementation: The Case of State Government Websites in Nigeria  pp48-59

Aderonke Oni, Adekunle Okunoye, Victor Mbarika

© Jun 2016 Volume 14 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 134

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Abstract

Abstract: This study evaluated the extent to which current status of e‑government implementation in Nigeria conforms to the national IT policy strategy. The study is based on content analysis of the official websites of the thirty six states and the feder al capital territory of the country. It focuses on the content, functional and construction features of the websites. It was found that, out of the thirty six states, only twenty‑three (64 percent) had websites and mostly provide textual information; fe w provide downloadable digital documents and functional online interactions. We recommend that, in addition to the National IT policy, Nigerian government needs to have an established guideline for its e‑government implementation and NITDA needs to be mor e proactive in its duty of monitoring IT policy implementation. The site designers should acknowledge the importance of government websites as the main channels for information dissemination, for facilitating citizens interaction with government and for transforming government operations. Thus, the websites must be more than static notice boards but be function‑oriented, dynamic and interactive.

 

Keywords: Keywords: content analysis, e-government, Nigeria, Website, evaluation, IT policy, ICT

 

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Journal Article

e‑Government and Technology Acceptance: The Case of the Implementation of Section 508 Guidelines for Websites  pp87-98

Paul T. Jaeger, Miriam Matteson

© Jan 2009 Volume 7 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 122

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Abstract

This paper examines the relevance of the Technology Acceptance Model for e‑Government websites at federal government level in the United States through an exploratory research study. Various unfunded government mandates over the past several years have required agencies to create websites, put services on the sites, and make them accessible to citizens, and the federal e‑Government now includes tens of thousands of sites. Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act, for example, was passed to ensure e‑Government sites would be accessible to persons with disabilities. By studying the implementation of the requirements of Section 508 through a number of data collection techniques and in terms of the Technology Acceptance Model, this paper seeks to use this particular law as an example through which to better understand the processes by which government agencies adopt e‑Government requirements and the actions that government managers can take to improve the implementation of such adoption.

 

Keywords: e-Government, technology acceptance model, accessibility, Section 508, disability, public servants, websites

 

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Journal Article

Digital Reporting Practices Among Malaysian Local Authorities  pp33-44

Erlane Ghani, Jamaliah Said

© Mar 2010 Volume 8 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 82

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Abstract

Using 109 Malaysian local authorities as the sample, this paper examines the type and extent of financial information disclosed digitally. This study further examines whether council size, performance and social obligation affect digital reporting. The results show that 64.2% maintain websites and out of this, 15.7% local authorities provide some disclosure on financial statements digitally. The results also show that performance and social obligation do influence the digital reporting practices among the local authorities. Further investigations reveal that lack of information technology facilities, inadequate specialised staff and lack of enforcement are among the factors deterring local authorities to disclose their financial information digitally. The results increase the body of knowledge by providing a continuous insight on the type and extent of information disclosed digitally by the Malaysian local authorities.

 

Keywords: digital reporting, local authorities, government, websites, Malaysia

 

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Journal Article

The use of Web 2.0 on Mexican State Websites: A Three‑Year Assessment  pp107-121

Rodrigo Sandoval-Almazan, J. Ramon Gil-Garcia, Luis F. Luna-Reyes, Dolores E. Luna, Gabriela Diaz-Murillo

© Dec 2011 Volume 9 Issue 2, ECEG, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp93 - 222

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Abstract

Web 2.0 tools and applications (e.g., blogs, wikis, forums, RSS, podcasts and videocasts) as well as social markers (e.g., Del.icio.us, Technorati, Facebook and Digg) have reached government and commerce sites; however, there is still a dearth of res earch related to the adoption levels of such tools. The purpose of this research is to contribute toward filling this gap by assessing the impact of this trend on Mexican local government sites by asking the following question: to what extent have local e ‑government websites in Mexico adopted Web 2.0 tools and applications? To answer this question, the paper starts by reviewing key concepts of Web 2.0 applications in government portals. On the basis of a longitudinal evaluation of Mexican local government sites, we found that most of the websites analyzed have increased their use of Web 2.0 tools and applications; however, we also found that not all applications are equally well‑developed or used on the local websites. Web 2.0 is only in the initial stage s of adoption in Mexican government websites.

 

Keywords: government 2.0, eGovernment, social media, Twitter, Web 2.0, websites

 

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Journal Article

The Accessibility of Moroccan Public Websites: Evaluation of Three e‑Government Websites  pp65-79

Ibtissam Bousarhane, Najima Daoudi

© Nov 2014 Volume 12 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 125

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Abstract

Abstract: Enabling people with disabilities to perceive, understand, navigate, contribute, create content and interact with the Web is the purpose of Web accessibility. The present research aims to evaluate the accessibility of three Moroccan e‑government websites to people with disabilities. To achieve the realization of this research, we opted for the method AccessiWeb and we analyzed, following this methodology, four to seven pages in each website. The evaluation results show the presence of several problems of accessibility in each of the three websites. Some accessibility problems, found in the three websites, are relating to level A criteria, other to level AA criteria, while the rest is relating to level AAA criteria. The presence of level A criteria that are not respected, in the three websites, makes us conclude that the three evaluated websites don’t meet the minimum level of accessibility. To reach the minimum level of accessibility, recommended by the W3C, all problems relating to level A and level AA criteria should be corrected. Various measures should be then taken to make the content of these websites perceivable, operable, understandable by users and robust. Thus, to make the content perceivable by users, the necessary measures to be taken can be summarized as follows : provide text equivalents for non‑textual items, increase the contrast ratio, make time‑based media clearly identifiable, provide summaries and titles for tables, make all links explicit, indicate changes of reading direction in the source code, organize the content by the use of titles, use CSS, associate form fields with relevant labels, offer accessible versions to documents for download and make it possible for users to control flashing contents. To make the content presented within the three websites operable, it is necessary to : make the control of time‑based media and no time‑based media possible by the keyboard, give pertinent titles for links and web pages, make explicit links that open in a new window, add links that help to bypass the blocks of content and the groups of links, provide information about the documents for download, ensure that navigation does not contain keyboard traps and that the sitemap page shows the general architecture of the website. Concerning the third principle, which consists on making the content understandable by users, context changes should be initiated by explicit buttons, language changes should be indicated in the source code, the labels associated with form fields should be appended with their fields, the indication of mandatory fields should be visible and the input control should be accompanied by suggestions that facilitate the correction of errors. Finally, the respect of the last principle, relating to robust content, requires to provide for each framework used a relevant title, to provide equivalent alternatives, working without Java, for scripts, to correct errors that exist in the source code, to make all media compatible with assistive technologies, to define the type of each document, to make sure that hidden texts are correctly rendered by assistive technologies and to provide an appropriate title for each form button.

 

Keywords: Web accessibility, e-government websites, Moroccan websites, Moroccan e-government, persons with disability, Web accessibility evaluation, AccessiWeb method, Web accessibility evaluation methodologies, Web accessibility evaluation tools

 

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Journal Article

A Critical Analysis of E‑government Evaluation Models at National and Local Municipal Levels  pp28-42

Dalal Ibrahem Zahran, Hana Abdullah Al-Nuaim, Malcolm John Rutter, David Benyon

© Nov 2015 Volume 13 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 76

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Abstract

Abstract: The importance of e‑government models lies in their offering a basis to measure and guide e‑government. There is still no agreement on how to assess a government online. Most of the e‑government models are not based on research, nor are they validated. In most countries, e‑government has not reached higher stages of growth. Several scholars have shown a confusing picture of e‑government. What is lacking is an in‑depth analysis of e‑government models. Responding to the need for such an analysis, this study identifies the strengths and weaknesses of major national and local e‑government evaluation models. The common limitations of most models are focusing on the government and not the citizen, missing qualitative measures, constructing the e‑equivalent of a bureaucratic administration, and defining general criteria without sufficient validations. In addition, this study has found that the metrics defined for national e‑government are not suitable for municipalities, and most of the existing studies have focused on national e‑governments even though local ones are closer to citizens. There is a need for developing a good theoretical model for both national and local municipal e‑government.

 

Keywords: Keywords: E-government, Municipality, E-government Evaluation Models, Web Evaluation, Usability, Citizen-centric Websites

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 7 Issue 1 / Jan 2009  pp1‑122

Editor: Frank Bannister

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Keywords: accessibility, barriers, BRAIN, business process, business rule, capacity for getting ahead, citizen participation, community building, coping and sense making strategies, developing nations, digital divide, disability, disenfranchisement, eDemocracy, e-governance, e-Government adoption, e-government readiness, Egypt, end-user approaches, e-readiness, information and communication technology, information dissemination, internet voting, IT transfer, KedaiKom, Malaysia, municipalities, policy participation, political participation, public participation, public sector, public servants, Section 508, service delivery, social and digital inclusion, social consequences, social participation, strategic planning, Switzerland, technology acceptance model, Telecentres, turnout, websites

 

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