The Electronic Journal of e-Government publishes perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Government

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Journal Article

MIDEM. Models for Interactive Decision Making  pp55-64

Auli Keskinen

© Jun 2004 Volume 2 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 74

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Abstract

This article is a broad reflection on e‑Democracy models used in several countries throughout the last 20 years. It is based on hands‑on experience gained through experiments and projects with local authorities conducted since the days of videotex. In essence, ICT can be utilised to radically transform the shape of political decision making into a citizen‑oriented vision. The realisation of this vision must involve the participation of people and continuous deliberation between citizens and political decision makers. Although e‑Democracy is considered a way for creating genuine dialogue between interest groups in a society in the future, the technology needs motivated communities to ensure self‑ governance is developed. If used properly ICT will transform our understanding of political action.

 

Keywords: e-Democracy, decision making, ICT, deliberative poll, televote, electronic town meeting, funnel model, citizen jury, referendum

 

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Journal Article

The e‑Citizen as talk, as text and as technology: CRM and e‑Government  pp147-158

Paul Richter, James Cornford, Ian McLoughlin

© Oct 2004 Volume 2 Issue 3, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp147 - 218

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Abstract

Public service transformation in the UK is being carried out in the name of the citizen and these changes — specifically those labelled as 'e‑Government' — bring with them the prospect of a significant shift in the nature of the relationship between government and its citizens. Of particular interest is the notion of the e‑Citizen, set against a contemporary public management backdrop featuring customer‑centric discoursesmetaphors, organisational transformation and ICT‑intensive 'private‑sector' business solutions. This paper focuses on a pilot study concerned with exploring the nature and role of socio‑technical and discursive factors which may be implicated in the 'shaping' of the e‑Citizen around the introduction of 'customer relationship management' (CRM) systems at a local government level. The research design draws on 'social shaping of technology' approaches and emphasises the significance of discursive events in these shaping processes. Preliminary findings suggest that citizen‑users of the new face to face access channel within local e‑government are being configured primarily as 'customers' which we suggest has significant implications for the traditional relationship between individuals and the institutions of government.

 

Keywords: e-government, citizen, customer service, discourse, technology

 

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Journal Article

Impacts of Internet use on Public Administration: A Case Study of the Brazilian Tax Administration  pp49-58

Maria Virginia de Vasconcellos, Maria das Graças Rua

© Jul 2005 Volume 3 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 58

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Abstract

This paper seeks to identify the effects of Internet used as a vehicle for sending federal tax returns through the RECEITANET program. The benefits that came out from security and costs reduction in the process of delivering tax returns are identified, as well as the impacts on Tax Administration (TA) and on the Treasury‑Taxpayer relationship.

 

Keywords: E-Government, G2C-Government to Citizen service, E-public service, IT application in Tax Administration, Transmitting Tax returns via Internet, Treasury-Taxpayer relationship, IT Evaluation

 

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Journal Article

Fad or Investment in the Future: An Analysis of the Demand of e‑Services in Danish Municipalities  pp19-26

Helle Zinner Henriksen

© Dec 2006 Volume 4 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 48

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Abstract

The Internet has created a new window for citizens to interact with the pubic sector through the means of electronic services (e‑services). Municipalities throughout the Western world are competing to offer as many e‑services as possible and several studies have explored the contents and nature of e‑services for citizens. Most of these studies have dealt with the possibilities and reach of e‑services. The present study applies a demand perspective focusing on which e‑services citizens actually use. The use of e‑services during the period May 2004 to October 2004 is analyzed based on log‑files from the largest Danish provider of municipal e‑services. The study fuels a discussion of whether or not the offerings of municipal offering of e‑services are driven by technology fads or if they are exponents of an investment in the future that aim at improving the quality of life of citizens.

 

Keywords: e-government, electronic citizen services, supply and demand

 

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Journal Article

e‑Administration, e‑Government, e‑Governance and the Learning City: A typology of Citizenship management using ICTs  pp213-218

Hélène Michel

© Feb 2006 Volume 3 Issue 4, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp157 - 240

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Abstract

Citizenship implies a certain model of relationship between citizens and their government. This type of relationship can be conceived in several ways. Citizenship can be presented in the form of an object to be governed in various ways. Using a two year research‑action study in the town of Vandoeuvre (France), we elaborated a typology of citizenship management using Information and Computer Technologies composed of four modes: E‑administration, E‑ government, E‑governance and "The Learning City". In the "e‑administration" mode, the citizen is considered as a « consumer of rights » claiming personalized and efficient public services. It corresponds to a government « for the people » with a strategy of citizen satisfaction improvement. The second mode, that we call "e‑government" reflects a vision of a relatively passive citizen‑agent, who responds to his duties. Based on the need of quantifying and comparing solutions, this government of the people relies on regular consultations in order to improve the policy's acceptance. In this perspective, electronic voting is the most appropriate tool, because it facilitates the communication of citizens' opinions to government, while conserving a consultative characteristic. In the "e‑governance" mode, the citizen is considered an active agent of local democracy. The citizen is now considered as a source of ideas and initiatives that provides a mutual enrichment. The e‑governance model can launch a reflection on the local government's knowledge management capacity. This could then result in a fourth type of the citizen relationship management, which would not be a government of the people, for the people or by the people, but according to the people. We called this mode "the Learning City". The logic underlying this approach would be: "learn how to learn", defining a range of possible actions, choosing the decision corresponding to the criteria considered to be essential to the success. The citizens would at the same time be actors and determinants of the rules. The role of the local officials and the corresponding ICT tools remain to be imagined.

 

Keywords: e-Administration, e-Government, e-Governance, learning organization, Citizen Relationship Management, local government, ICT

 

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Journal Article

Mypage and Borger.dk — A Case Study of Two Government Service Web Portals  pp165-176

Karin Furuli, Sigrun Kongsrud

© Dec 2007 Volume 5 Issue 2, ECEG 2007, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp95 - 224

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Abstract

This case study investigates the development of national portals offering online public services to citizens. Norway and Denmark are leading the way in developing online public services for citizens. In this study the development of the citizen portals Borger.dk in Denmark and Mypage in Norway will be examined. At present, documented research on national citizen portals is limited. Comparing the similarities and differences of citizen portals is an important part of e‑ government development. We have used a framework for comparing the portals. The research questions to be answered in this case study are; Why are citizen portals created? How does one deal with matters of security? How is portal development organized? This study is also intended to bring to light factors that have led to the differences in the development of Borger.dk and Mypage. The study is based on published and unpublished reports from the two countries in question, together with interviews with key persons. Of additional interest, in conducting this study, is the opportunity to gain greater insight into the development of online services provided by the public sector. This case study also raises further questions relating to e‑government to be used in future research.

 

Keywords: e-government, e-services, framework for comparing citizen portals, citizen portal, online public services, Borgerdk, Mypage

 

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Journal Article

Critical Factors in an Electronic Democracy: a Study of Municipal Managers  pp23-30

Tony Carrizales

© Apr 2008 Volume 6 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 64

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Abstract

Amid the growing research of e‑Government, prominent e‑democracy practices have been regulated to sporadic, largely populated municipalities, throughout the world. This article examines the various factors that support and deter the practices of an electronic democracy. Factors which potentially challenge and support the progress of online democratic practices are explored. These factors include budgetary constraints, form of government, and ideological perspectives of municipal managers. Chief administrative officers were surveyed on their views of e‑ Government, with specific focus on the function of e‑democracy. The data reviews online practices of municipalities in New Jersey, and through ordinal regression it becomes evident what are some critical factors for the future potential of an e‑democratic society.

 

Keywords: e-democracy, e-Government, citizen participation, municipal managers

 

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Journal Article

Examining the Barriers to e‑Government Adoption  pp113-122

Richard W. Schwester

© Jan 2009 Volume 7 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 122

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Abstract

e‑Government initially began as process where government entities developed websites and began populating these sites with information. After mastering this information dissemination aspect, government units moved toward processing online transactions. Subsequent to mastering transaction processing, governments moved across a continuum and engaged citizens online in a participatory framework; that is, offering Internet applications that connect citizens with public administrators, decision‑makers, and perhaps elected officials. While the subsequent progression and potential benefits of e‑Government applications are without limits, there are a number of barriers that impede the implementation of such applications. Using survey data collected by the International CityCounty Management Association (ICMA), this paper examines the factors that most impede the adoption of e‑Government applications. Central research questions include: what are the differences between municipalities that have comprehensive e‑ Government platforms and those that do not, and to what extent do certain barriers explain these differences? Multiple regression results indicate that e‑Government adoption is a function of financial, technical, and human resources. Holding all other factors constant, municipalities with higher operating budgets, more full‑time IT staff, and technical resources are more likely to implement a comprehensive e‑Government platform. Political support is a key and fairly robust determinant of municipal e‑Government adoption as well.

 

Keywords: e-Government adoption, municipalities, barriers, service delivery, information dissemination, citizen participation

 

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