The Electronic Journal of e-Government publishes perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Government

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Journal Article

Towards a Framework for eGovernment Development in Nigeria  pp147-160

Darren Mundy, Bandi Musa

© Dec 2010 Volume 8 Issue 2, ECEG Conference Issue, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp83 - 235

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Abstract

Globally eGovernment is associated with providing opportunities to increase the connection, availability and modes of interactivity between governance at multiple levels and the citizen. It is also associated with transforming current governmental services in ways to increase efficiencies, improve processes and automate tasks previously undertaken by governmental employees. Growing demands at national government level (often subsidised by public money) and amongst citizen groups across the world lead to a greater focus on the provision of eGovernment services. Often governmental demands for improvements to service clash with citizen requirements. Governments which want to remain relevant to their citizens must take an active role in the implementation of eGovernment. Citizens have witnessed the advances in personalisation of service, accessibility and greater use of technology in the private sector that has created an expansion of innovative ICT solutions and they are now demanding that their governments do the same. This creates an environment where the provision of eGovernment services must be approached with seriousness and with the consideration of the requirements of all stakeholder groups. The aim of this paper is to detail research undertaken to examine the path towards implementation of mature eGovernment services in the country of Nigeria. The research has included a comprehensive benchmarking activity in relation to the content analysis of state government websites in Nigeria and comparison to equivalent provision of council websites in the UK. Following this an eGovernment services requirements survey targeted at citizens was conducted to determine from a citizen perspective the present need for and evaluation of eGovernment services across Nigeria and the UK. In terms of findings, the content analysis demonstrated significant shortcomings with existing state government websites in Nigeria with only 30% of websites analysed providing basic mechanisms for citizens to interact with government services. The analysis of citizen requirements found that amongst those user groups targeted there was a high level of expectation in relation to the provision of eGovernment services and also found that the Nigerian citizens surveyed were more engaged with the benefits that eGovernment could bring to their nation.

 

Keywords: eGovernment framework, eGovernment analysis, citizen requirements, Nigerian eGovernment, e-Services, eGovernment development

 

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Journal Article

Examining the Potential for Channel Shift in the UK Through Multiple Lenses  pp203-213

Darren Mundy, Qasim Umer, Alastair Foster

© Dec 2011 Volume 9 Issue 2, ECEG, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp93 - 222

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Abstract

As we globally enter a period of shifting economic fortunes and austerity measures, public service bodies continue to look to make provision more effective and efficient. In this context, such organisations look at service provision, making judgements on the value, type, and location of such provision. Inevitably questions arise as to whether particular aspects of provision can operate differently or be served through different channels at lower cost (saved either through cost of service or efficiency sa vings from doing things better). Questions arise about whether savings are possible, and what opportunities are offered through revision of service. Citizens are also becoming more demanding over service provision, recognising government wastage and dema nding service reform that best makes use of the public purse. The aim of this paper is to detail research findings from a project designed to discover the scope for channel shift (principally migrating users from mediated to self‑help solutions) within local government services. The research was carried out on behalf of a group consisting of regional and local governmental public bodies including nine councils and the local area police force. The research consisted of four defined stages: identification from within the public sector bodies of scope for shifting provision; collection of case studies related to successful switches of provision; sampling of customer groups in relation to perspectives on changes to provision; and the creation of a framework to support a business case for strategic decision making regarding channel shift. In terms of project findings, within the initial stage of the project there was no shortage of ideas related to the potential for change to provision linked to a channel sh ift. The issue was explored through Customer Service Managers with all identifying services with clear scope for change from the automation of different elements of environmental services, through a more comprehensive linking together of benefits services , to simple customer data collection. However, one of the underlying issues is the lack of accessible management data that can easily be aggregated together to support a business case for provision reform. This initial data provided a starting point for t he discovery of case studies linked to channel shift and service migration. Thirteen case studies were highlighted from the research linked to the areas identified by Customer Service Managers where reform may make a difference. This case study material p rovided a range of information about key benefits and issues with service reform in the identified areas. Following case study identification, customer perceptions on service reform were canvassed (n=197 customers at six locations) through the use of a detailed questionnaire. The results suggest that: there are concerns regarding access to e‑service provision (brought about through either lack of technology or knowledge); that there is a demand for system reform (focused on doing things the right way for the right cost); finally, that at present the most valuable local government service offered on the web is access to local information with this sometimes being difficult to find. In the final stage of the project a business case template was design ed. The business case was to better enable strategic decision making regarding channel shift. The business case is designed to enable the evaluation of requests for service channel growth with critical examination of potential success factors for the shif t of government services. Research around successful case study data also identified cases wherein success had not been achieved. Development and implementation of a business case template should enable teams to develop a better understanding of the poten tial for success or failure and indicate clearly measures needed to best support channel shift occurring.

 

Keywords: eGovernment, channel shift, transformational government, citizen requirements, e-services

 

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