The Electronic Journal of e-Government publishes perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Government

For general enquiries email administrator@ejeg.com

Click here to see other Scholarly Electronic Journals published by API
For a range of research text books on this and complimentary topics visit the Academic Bookshop

Information about the European Conference on Digital Government is available here

 

Journal Article

Conceptualising Citizen's Trust in e‑Government: Application of Q Methodology  pp295-310

Hisham Alsaghier, Marilyn Ford, Anne Nguyen, Rene Hexel

© Dec 2009 Volume 7 Issue 4, ECEG 2009, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp295 - 432

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

In e‑government context, trust plays a vital role in helping citizens overcome perceived risks. Trust makes citizens comfortable sharing personal information, make online government transaction, and acting on e‑ Government advices. Thus, trust is a significant notion that should be critically investigated to help both researchers and practitioners to understand citizens' acceptance to e‑Government. Prior research in trust has focused mainly on consumer's trust in e‑Commerce. Most of existing literatures on trust in e‑government focus on technical perspective such as PKI. This paper contributes by proposing a conceptual model of citizens' trust in e‑ Government. The proposed conceptual model of citizens' trust in e‑government is integrated constructs from multiple disciplines: psychology, sociology, e‑commerce, and HCI. The research is aimed also to develop items in order to measure the theoretical constructs in the proposed model. The pool of items is generated based on literature review. Q‑Methodology has been utilised to validate the generated measurement items. The outcome of two Q‑sorting rounds resulted in developing a survey instrument for proposed model with an excellent validity and reliability statistical results.

 

Keywords: e-government, trust, perceived risk, citizens' participation, technology acceptance model

 

Share |

Journal Article

Case Study: e‑Youth City Council Project an Alternative e‑Government for Young People  pp349-360

Gemma Gibert i Font

© Dec 2009 Volume 7 Issue 4, ECEG 2009, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp295 - 432

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

This article presents an explanatory analysis of an e‑ Youth City Council project held in the town of Sant Andreu de Llavaneres, Catalonia, during the year 2008. The main objectives of this programme were to increase citizen participation, improve good governance and through it, the possibility of consolidating and strengthening democracy by ICT use. This case study was based on a survey of 628 young people aged between 14 and 18. The aim was to motivate and enable them to play an active role in politics and to take up positions of genuine authority and responsibility, within local decision making, as pre‑voting citizens. In this way, the young people engaged to develop all stages of the electoral process, participated in an e‑voting system and were empowered in local government for 15 days. In this case polity was translated into practice and created a successful partnership between young citizens and the local political parties. The focus of this ICT research was, basically, which tools the youngsters used and the influence it had on electorate participation In this way, the ICT acquired a new perspective relating to this study group who are considered a generation raised in a computerised era and who are leaders in the fields of innovation and communication, used as a common tool in their social life and work. The analysis is described and evaluated by explanatory variables such as; population, age, ICT use and access, number of voters and abstentions, the ajuntamentjove.cat website , political party blogs, electoral campaign spots and meetings, the electronic voting system and finally the video " Youth Government Constitution" broadcast by internet into the school classroom. Electronic voting has been incorporated as a pilot test, consisting of a voting system of closed lists with a choice of up to two preferential candidates.

 

Keywords: e-government, young citizens, participation, ICT, democracy and policy, e-voting

 

Share |

Journal Article

The use of Official and Unofficial Channels in Government‑Citizen Communication in China  pp79-91

Zhe Wang, Nena Lim

© Sep 2011 Volume 9 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 92

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

The objective of this research is to examine Chinese citizens attitudes towards official and unofficial channels in both government‑to‑citizen (G2C) and citizen‑to‑government (C2G) communication. It investigates citizens preferred channel choices fo r receiving public information and for expressing their personal opinions. Analysis of an online survey shows that respondents have no obvious preference of official or unofficial channels for receiving public information. Yet most respondents prefer unof ficial channels for C2G communications because these channels have less language restrictions, allow respondents to hide their identities, and facilitate respondents to obtain a sense of support from people who have similar opinions.

 

Keywords: The objective of this research is to examine Chinese citizens attitudes towards official and unofficial channels in both government-to-citizen, G2C, and citizen-to-government, C2G, communication. It investigates citizens preferred channel choices for receiving public information and for expressing their personal opinions. Analysis of an online survey shows that respondents have no obvious preference of official or unofficial channels for receiving public information. Yet most respondents prefer unofficial channels for C2G communications because these channels have less language restrictions, allow respondents to hide their identities, and facilitate respondents to obtain a sense of support from people who have similar opinions.

 

Share |

Journal Article

Citizen Involvement in Local Environmental Governance: A Methodology Combining Human‑Centred Design and Living lab Approaches  pp106-114

Sandrine Reiter, Guillaume Gronier, Philippe Valoggia

© Dec 2014 Volume 12 Issue 2, ECEG 2014, Editor: Frank Banister, pp95 - 207

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Abstract: Nowadays, involving citizens in Local Environmental Governance (LEG) is becoming increasingly important. In order to empower the role of citizen in this context, we propose an approach that relies on the establishment of a physical and intelle ctual space for shared understanding and collaboration between all stakeholders impacted by an environmental problem (in our case odour emission). Based on the development of an Information Technology (IT) system allowing odour emission measurement as well as the collection of citizen feedback, a Living Lab (LL) approach is being implemented that involves citizens, public authorities, industry and environmental non‑governmental organisations (NGOs). According to the definition of the European com mission, Living Labs are open innovation environments in real‑life settings, in which user‑driven innovation is fully integrated within the co‑creation process of new services, products and societal infrastructuresŽ. Based on this definition and consider ing, in our case, citizens as one of the end‑users of the IT system, we argue that such an approach will empower their role in local environmental governance. This article presents the method and techniques that will be used in order to set up such a Livi ng Lab. More precisely, we focus here on the first step of this method: defining the components that will support the management of a Living Lab relying on an IT system. This step consists in the identification of the Living Lab stakeholders (citizen, in dustry, public authorities, NGOs, etc.), including their characteristics, fears, expectations, involvement and engagement regarding the Living Lab. To do this, 2 main approaches are being combined: A Living Lab approach that aims to involve citizens in l ocal Environmental Governance (LEG) design. Use of Human‑Centred Design (HCD), to combine IT developments and LL needs, for example Personas methodology and usability test. A Living Lab relies mainly on stakeholders involvement in order to build trus t and establish a common goal. In this sense, sociologists approaches ((Akrich et al. 2006);) bring valuable information on how to mobilise different actors in order to innovate (Actor Network Theory). However, in the innovation process, these app roaches are only considering human actors and do not take into account any technological aspects. However, if Living Labs are relying on human actors interactions it should also take into account their interactions with the IT system it is based on. In t his case, Human‑Centred Design (HCD) being an approach that aims to make IT systems usable and useful by focusing on the users, their needs and requirements, is to be considered as complementary to the sociologists approaches. This article, based on the work performed in the FP7 European project OMNISCIENTIS, presents the theoretical context in which this study takes place as well as the overall methodology.

 

Keywords: Keywords: citizens involvement, living lab, environmental governance, human-centred design

 

Share |

Journal Article

Enabling Citizen Participation in Gov 2.0: An Empowerment Perspective  pp77-93

Mohammed Aladalah, Yen Cheung, Vincent Lee

© Dec 2015 Volume 13 Issue 2, ECEG2015, Editor: Carl Adams, pp75 - 160

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Abstract: In order to investigate the low levels of citizen participation in Gov2.0, we used the theoretical lens of empowerment to better understand the use of Gov2.0. The paper includes an analysis of both management and psychology literatures; elaborates and discusses the conceptual issues of citizen empowerment, satisfaction, and participation in Gov2.0. A research model to enhance the understanding of citizen participation in Gov 2.0 is presented in this paper. The model includes four factors pertaining to empowerment theory: sense of impact, competence, meaningfulness and sense of control, which are believed to influence citizen participation in Gov2.0. A further positive outcome of citizen empowerment is higher levels of satisfaction with Gov 2.0. These suggestions make a strong case for citizen empowerment in Gov 2.0 to enhance the understanding of citizen participation in Gov. 2.0 as well as providing useful information for government agencies. Government agency decision‑makers can also benefit from new insights into citizen participation and enhance citizen experiences with Gov2.0. The paper concludes with implications for theory and practice, and suggests avenues for future work.

 

Keywords: Keywords: Gov 2.0, citizens, participation, empowerment, satisfaction

 

Share |

Journal Article

Beyond Information‑Sharing. A Typology Of Government Challenges And Requirements For Two‑Way Social Media Communication With Citizens  pp32-45

Enzo Falco, Reinout Kleinhans

© May 2018 Volume 16 Issue 1, Editor: Dr Carl Erik Moe, pp1 - 86

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Despite great advances in ICT, social media, participatory platforms and mobile apps, we seem to still be locked in the one‑way communication “paradigm” where information flows unilaterally from government to citizens and seldom vice‑versa. As a result, citizens are more receivers rather than conscious producers of information, data, ideas, solutions and decisions in the context of public policies. By means of an extensive literature review, this paper aims to explore the challenges on the part of government that prevent the transition to more dialogic governance and identifies the requirements for a meaningful application of social media for this purpose. The paper contributes to the literature in three ways: i) redefining a typology of social media‑based citizens‑government relationship; ii) clarifying the difference between challenges and risks of social media application by governments and identifying a typology of government challenges; and iii) identifying government requirements as a conditio sine‑qua non for overcoming these challenges upfront, enabling more effective two‑way interactions between governments and citizens. The paper concludes with discussion of implications and directions for further research.

 

Keywords: Social media, Social media-based collaboration, Government challenges, Government requirements, Citizen engagement, Two-way communication, Citizens-government relationship

 

Share |

Journal Article

Degree of Digitalization and Citizen Satisfaction: A Study of the Role of Local e‑Government in Sweden  pp59-71

Irene Bernhard, Livia Norström, Ulrika Lundh Snis, Urban Gråsjö, Martin Gellerstedt

© May 2018 Volume 16 Issue 1, Editor: Dr Carl Erik Moe, pp1 - 86

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

The aim was to investigate whether there is a relationship between degree of e‑government in Swedish municipalities and perceived satisfaction among citizens generally. This is a large‑scale quantitative study based on valid and reliable Swedish national surveys. Based on these surveys, a new comprehensive index for measuring “degree of digitalization” was constructed. Citizen satisfaction was measured using established indices covering three dimensions: satisfaction with living in the municipality, satisfaction with performance of government activities (delivered services), and satisfaction with transparency and influence. The results show that there is a relationship between the degree of digitalization in a municipality and the perceived satisfaction among its citizens. The degree of digitalization is related to all three dimensions of citizen satisfaction. Additionally, this study indicates that the strength of this relationship is in parity with or even stronger than the relationship between citizen satisfaction and other crucial factors such as educational level and median income.

 

Keywords: degree of digitalization, satisfied citizens, local e-government, municipality, Sweden

 

Share |

Journal Article

Bringing Light into the Shadows: A Qualitative Interview Study on Citizens’ Non‑Adoption of e‑Government  pp98-105

Bettina Distel

© Oct 2018 Volume 16 Issue 2, Editor: Dr Carl Erik Moe, pp87 - 146

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Despite the growing availability of e‑government services, citizens are still reluctant to use them. Prior research has mostly focused on investigating reasons for e‑government use. Why individuals refrain from using these services seems to be of less scientific interest. The present study sets out to reveal what barriers to e‑government adoption citizens perceive. A qualitative and explorative interview study was conducted with 18 citizens in Germany to better understand how citizens perceive e‑government and what keeps them from using it. The study yields twelve different barriers to e‑government adoption among which no need to use/rare usage of public services, no personal counsellor, and perceptions of convenience are the most important. The results suggest that the characteristics of the services themselves are highly influential for the decision to not use e‑government. In contrast, technological shortcomings like data security or a lack of usability only play a subordinate role.

 

Keywords: Adoption, non-adoption, channel choice, citizens, Germany, qualitative research

 

Share |