The Electronic Journal of e-Government publishes perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Government

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Journal Article

Governmental Collaboration and Infrastructural Standards in Belgium  pp145-152

Alea Fairchild, Bruno de Vuyst

© Dec 2007 Volume 5 Issue 2, ECEG 2007, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp95 - 224

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Abstract

The Belgian federal government's June 2004 decision to promote the use of open standards has been reinforced by the launch of BELGIF [BELgian Government Interoperability Framework], launched by the ICEG working group of the Belgian government in May 2005, and the 2006 decision to mandate ODF as the standard office document exchange format by September 2008. This paper discusses the issues surrounding the BELGIF implementation and ODF mandate and the challenges still to overcome, given that interoperability defines how technical systems, people and organisations work together, in a country with three languages and five layers of government.

 

Keywords: e-government, collaboration, standards

 

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Journal Article

Strategies for Orchestrating and Managing Supply Chains in Public Service Networks  pp425-432

Anne Fleur van Veenstra, Marijn Janssen, Bram Klievink

© Dec 2009 Volume 7 Issue 4, ECEG 2009, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp295 - 432

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Abstract

Joining‑up is high on the e‑government agenda as this is expected to improve service delivery to citizens and businesses. It requires public and private organizations to cooperate with each other within networks that are formed around public services that cross the boundaries of organizations. Cross‑organizational processes in such a network are called supply chains, aimed at delivering integrated services. The performance of each individual organization within the network influences aspects such as lead‑time and quality of services delivered. In order to effectively integrate the efforts of the various organizations involved, a strategy needs to be in place to orchestrate and manage a service delivery chain. Various types of strategies can be employed. Yet little knowledge is available about which strategies are effective under which circumstances. In this paper we identify four different strategies for managing and orchestrating cross‑organizational service chains. These supply chain management (SCM) strategies are based on literature research and case study analysis. The four strategies are identified based on two dimensions: the level of control (i.e. governance structure) and the architectural approach for systems integration. These four strategies are: merger, orchestra, relay race, and broadcasting. For three of the four strategies, illustrative cases have been found. The strategy selection depends on factors such as the institutional environment, political ambitions and organizational readiness. Furthermore, each strategy has its own merits and demerits. We recommend investigating the relationship between situational characteristics and SCM strategies in further research.

 

Keywords: e-government, joined-up government, Supply Chain Management, SCM, inter-organizational collaboration, governance, integration strategy

 

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Journal Article

Beyond Information‑Sharing. A Typology Of Government Challenges And Requirements For Two‑Way Social Media Communication With Citizens  pp32-45

Enzo Falco, Reinout Kleinhans

© May 2018 Volume 16 Issue 1, Editor: Dr Carl Erik Moe, pp1 - 86

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Abstract

Despite great advances in ICT, social media, participatory platforms and mobile apps, we seem to still be locked in the one‑way communication “paradigm” where information flows unilaterally from government to citizens and seldom vice‑versa. As a result, citizens are more receivers rather than conscious producers of information, data, ideas, solutions and decisions in the context of public policies. By means of an extensive literature review, this paper aims to explore the challenges on the part of government that prevent the transition to more dialogic governance and identifies the requirements for a meaningful application of social media for this purpose. The paper contributes to the literature in three ways: i) redefining a typology of social media‑based citizens‑government relationship; ii) clarifying the difference between challenges and risks of social media application by governments and identifying a typology of government challenges; and iii) identifying government requirements as a conditio sine‑qua non for overcoming these challenges upfront, enabling more effective two‑way interactions between governments and citizens. The paper concludes with discussion of implications and directions for further research.

 

Keywords: Social media, Social media-based collaboration, Government challenges, Government requirements, Citizen engagement, Two-way communication, Citizens-government relationship

 

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Journal Article

Translating Telephone Calls To Spreadsheets: Generating Knowledge on Citizen Multichannel Behavior in Collaboration With Caseworkers  pp106-118

Christian Østergaard Madsen

© Oct 2018 Volume 16 Issue 2, Editor: Dr Carl Erik Moe, pp87 - 146

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Abstract

Public organizations increasingly seek to digitalize their services, and migrate citizens from traditional communication channels towards digital self‑service channels. In Denmark, digital communication and self‑service channels are mandatory for public organizations, citizens and businesses. Denmark has the highest share of citizens who use digital channels to interact with public authorities in the EU. However, the use of traditional channels remains high, and occurs among adopters and non‑adopters of digital channels alike. Within the multichannel management stream of e‑government research, there is a methodological gap in how knowledge can be generated on citizen multichannel behavior, and why citizens continue to use traditional channels. Practitioners need this knowledge to improve administrative efficiency and citizens’ satisfaction with digital services. Therefore, this paper presents a study of how scholars, practitioners, and caseworkers collaborated to generate data on citizen multichannel behavior. The study occurred in the public authority Udbetaling Danmark, where caseworkers periodically use an IT system to log incoming calls. First, a draft version of a classification scheme was created from co‑listening to calls and contextual interviews with citizens. To ensure engagement and a common understanding of the classification categories, the scheme was co‑developed with caseworkers in three iterations. Observations, joint discussions and interviews were used to uncover problems related to caseworkers’ understanding of the scheme, and identify technical and practical problems related to its use. With the new classification scheme, the share of logged calls increased from 10 ‑ 50 percent to 90 ‑ 95 percent. Moreover, the collaboration led to a closer understanding of citizens’ problems among the involved actors and a willingness for future collaboration to improve the services. This paper contributes to the multichannel management field of e‑government and to practitioners by presenting a method for how knowledge can be generated on citizen multichannel behavior in collaboration with caseworkers.

 

Keywords: multichannel management, citizen multichannel behavior, action research, collaboration, caseworkers, Udbetaling Danmark

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 5 Issue 2, ECEG 2007 / Dec 2007  pp95‑224

Editor: Frank Bannister

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Editorial

This issue contains a selection of the best papers from the 2007 European Conference on e‑Government which took place in The Hague . Our host was Den Haagse Hogeschool, which is housed in a building which can best be described as a series of large ellipses piled on top of one another. Finding a given room on a given level involved a decision as to whether to go clockwise or anticlockwise round this structure and there was plenty of empirical evidence of the validity of the *buttered toast law as the later one was for a presentation, the more likely one seemed to be to go the longer way around.

As usual with this issue, there are a large number of articles and they come from many countries. A number of contributors consider various aspects of government portals and on‑line services. Aykut Arslan looks at the impact of ICT on local government in Turkey , concluding that although progress has been made, there is much to be done, especially in moving beyond efficiency to broader goals of inclusion and democracy. On the other side of the continent, Karin Furuli and Sigrun Kongsrud compare and contrast government portals in Demark and Norway . The framework that they develop for doing this may be of interest to other researchers and has wide potential application. In their article, Ralph Feenstra, Marijn Janssen and René Wagenaar (who sadly died in 2007), examine the question of composition methods for web based government services where there are multiple actors. Composition is the process of combining several services (usually from different suppliers) necessary for the completion of a single task and evaluating methods of doing this is non trivial. Regina Connolly's article focuses on the factors that influence the take up and effectiveness of Ireland 's Revenue Online Service tax payment system and provides several useful insights that could be applied elsewhere. Alea Fairchild and Bruno de Vuyst consider another aspect of government service, the Belgian Government Interoperability Framework (BELGIF) and look at the problems of interoperability in a country with its own particular administrative and political complexities.

Document management is a topic that to date has received little attention in the e‑government literature. Two papers here contribute to making up for this deficiency. For anybody who would like a primer as well as an interesting model, the article by Raphael Kunis, Gudula Rünger and Michael Schwind is an informative read. Mitja Decman also considers the matter of government documents, this time from the perspective of archiving and long term storage. As well as being another good overview of the issues involved, the case for having confidence in such forms of storage is well argued.

The conference has always attracted a number of contributions on electronic voting and e‑democracy In their article, Orhan and Deniz Cetinkaya give a sweeping overview of e‑voting, arguing that there is sometimes a lack of clarity in terminology and suggesting that appropriate levels of verification and validation should be applied to e‑voting in different situations. Mark Liptrott's article on e‑voting presents a rather different perspective, examining the successes and failures of the 2003 e‑voting experiment in the UK . His conclusion is that government will need to be proactive and learn the lessons of Roger's diffusion theory if it is going to get widespread public acceptance of this technology. In a different part of the e‑democracy forest, Jenny Backhouse arrives as a somewhat similar conclusion, that engagement with e‑democracy in Australia seeks unlikely to break out spontaneously with given models. Using analogies from e‑business, she concludes, however, that e‑democracy is here to stay whether we like it or not!

Finally, two papers with broader themes. Albert Meijer opens his article with the provocative question; “Are all countries heading for similar political systems in the information age?” He then looks at this question using empirical research in the USA and The Netherlands which suggests that convergence is not happening in quite the way some expect. Mary Griffiths looks at something quite different, the South Australian Oxygen programme (designed to connect the X and Y generations) which seeks to equip young people for civil engagement via electronic media. The results of this experiment are refreshingly positive and again, as in other articles in this issue, there are lessons for a wider world.

 

Keywords: archiving, Australia, Borger.dk, citizen portal, collaboration, diffusion, digital archive, digital preservation, document management systems, document processing, e-administration, e-business model, e-democracy, e-government security, electronic data, electronic record management, e-municipality, e-participation, e-Turkey, evaluation, e-voting, hierarchical government processes, institutional differences, interoperability, multi-actor networks, Mypage, online public services, outsourcing, peer-managed intranets, pilot scheme, political accountability, Protocols, public policy process, public value, quality of service, record keeping, SERVQUAL, social value, standards, taxation, Transferability, trust, Turkish e-governments, Turkish local governments, UGC, validation, verification, virtual village, web service composition

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 7 Issue 4, ECEG 2009 / Dec 2009  pp295‑432

Editor: Frank Bannister

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Keywords: Africa, back-office automation, Brazil, citizens’ participation, developing countries, DOI and emerging economy access, DynaVote, e-government data interoperability, e-Justice, electronic voting, eVoting requirements, Fez e-government, form generation, GIF, goal orientation, governance, health information systems, implementation, information technology, institution theory, integration strategy, intellectual capital, interoperability, Interoperability tool, inter-organizational collaboration, joined-up government, new public management, ontology, perceived risk, practically, public value, records computerization, records management, supply chain management (SCM), TAM, technology acceptance model, trust, web services, WSML/WSMO, XML schema

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 16 Issue 1 / May 2018  pp1‑86

Editor: Dr Carl Erik Moe

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Keywords: ICT4D, Capability Approach, Design-reality gap, ICT4D evaluation, ICT4D champion, Jigawa ICT, economic empowerment, information infrastructure, e-government, implementation, public-private partnership (PPP), least developed countries (LDCs), sub-Saharan Africa, Rwanda, Social media, Social media-based collaboration, Government challenges, Government requirements, Citizen engagement, Two-way communication, Citizens-government relationship, enterprise architecture (EA), adoption, organisational change, resistance towards EA, relevant EA goals, EA practices in use, survey research, degree of digitalization, satisfied citizens, local e-government, municipality, Sweden, E-government, User Participation, Public e-service development

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 16 Issue 2 / Oct 2018  pp87‑146

Editor: Dr Carl Erik Moe

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Keywords: task characteristics, business intelligence success, public sector, quantitative research, Adoption, non-adoption, channel choice, citizens, Germany, qualitative research, multichannel management, citizen multichannel behavior, action research, collaboration; caseworkers, Udbetaling Danmark, Public-private partnership, outsourcing, Rule of law, e-government, Digital Government, the Danish Parliamentary Ombudsman, Administrative law by design, digitalisation, administrative law, good administrative impact assessment, , crisis management, leadership, information management, situational awareness, crisis response, crisis management system

 

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