The Electronic Journal of e-Government publishes perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Government

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Journal Article

The e‑Citizen as talk, as text and as technology: CRM and e‑Government  pp147-158

Paul Richter, James Cornford, Ian McLoughlin

© Oct 2004 Volume 2 Issue 3, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp147 - 218

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Abstract

Public service transformation in the UK is being carried out in the name of the citizen and these changes — specifically those labelled as 'e‑Government' — bring with them the prospect of a significant shift in the nature of the relationship between government and its citizens. Of particular interest is the notion of the e‑Citizen, set against a contemporary public management backdrop featuring customer‑centric discoursesmetaphors, organisational transformation and ICT‑intensive 'private‑sector' business solutions. This paper focuses on a pilot study concerned with exploring the nature and role of socio‑technical and discursive factors which may be implicated in the 'shaping' of the e‑Citizen around the introduction of 'customer relationship management' (CRM) systems at a local government level. The research design draws on 'social shaping of technology' approaches and emphasises the significance of discursive events in these shaping processes. Preliminary findings suggest that citizen‑users of the new face to face access channel within local e‑government are being configured primarily as 'customers' which we suggest has significant implications for the traditional relationship between individuals and the institutions of government.

 

Keywords: e-government, citizen, customer service, discourse, technology

 

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Journal Article

e‑Governmentality: On Electronic Administration in Local Government  pp39-48

Katarina Giritli Nygren

© Jan 2009 Volume 7 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 122

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Abstract

As a consequence of the advance of information technology into the realm of public administration, we are now faced with a potential increase in efficiency of a scope and power not previously seen. The intentional use of information technology to modernise the public sector goes internationally by the name of e‑Government. While e‑ Government's greatest impact thus far has been to promote customer satisfaction, its guiding spirit is more ambitious, with the fundamental reorganisation of the entire public sector in its sights. The overall purpose of this paper is to contribute to the understanding of how public administration at a local authority level adapts to impending e‑Government by considering the discourses that are manifested and how they are used to understand and legitimise electronic administration. The present study uses critical discourse analysis to shed light on those discursive orders that are revealed in the course of deliberations on electronic administration at the local government level. On the one hand, it is possible to see electronic administration as a refinement ‑ and a reform ‑ of a bureaucracy's techniques. On the other hand, it is equally possible to view it in the light of free market ideology.

 

Keywords: e-Government, state management, public sector, critical discourse analysis, public administration, governmentality

 

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Journal Article

Virtual Acts of Balance!: Virtual Technologies of Knowledge‑Management as co‑Produced by Social Intentions and Technical Limitations  pp183-197

Anders Koed Madsen

© Dec 2013 Volume 11 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp181 - 322

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Abstract

Abstract: This paper presents an analysis of official documents and white papers pertaining to two web‑portals (The Policy Grid Project and FEED) that are launched in the United Kingdom (UK) and the European Union (EU) respectively. The aim of the p ortals is to filter and synthesize information relevant for policy discussions and thereby improve ´knowledge‑democracy´ in different ways. The paper denotes such portals ´virtual technologies of knowledge management´ and it presents documental data as a window to analyze and discuss the infrastructural choices of such portals. The analysis is grounded in theories related to Social Construction of Technology and it shows how the framing of the portals and the concrete digital choices taken in relation t o the infrastructure are influenced by the intentions of relevant social groups as well as by the technical limitations on computers abilities to process semantic data. It is especially emphasized how technical web‑ontologies implicitly carry with them d eeper philosophical ontologies about phenomena such as ´politics´, ´scientific intentionality´ and ´freedom´. The compromise between these technical limitations and the social intentions is described as a ´virtual act of balance´. The paper accordingly co ncludes that a co‑production of technical infrastructures and social values takes place in the process of designing these types of portals. It illustrates the necessity of formalizing part of the policy‑making process if semantic machines are to play a si gnificant role in policy‑making. Computer‑based information‑processing makes software increasingly powerful and it is argued that the ´e‑governance community´ has to be reflective about this development and constantly consider the trade‑offs between struc tured semantics and looser types of classification of policy issues.

 

Keywords: Keywords: e-governance, knowledge-democracy, socio-semantic web, social construction of technology, discourse analysis

 

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