The Electronic Journal of e-Government publishes perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Government

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Journal Article

Does the Internet help to overcome social exclusion?  pp139-146

Paul Foley

© Oct 2004 Volume 2 Issue 2, ECEG 2004, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp75 - 146

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Abstract

This paper describes one of the first studies to investigate the take‑up and impact of ICT amongst socially excluded groups. 130 people took part in 20 focus group discussions. The study: Investigated the factors that influence the adoption and use of the Internet by socially excluded groups; Identified tangible economic and social benefits arising from having access and making use of the Internet; Recommends policies and future action concerning the targeting of resources and the design and likely success of current interventions to promote Internet use. The study shows that some clear and quantifiable benefits can arise from Internet access by socially excluded groups. If the level of use of online information is used as a surrogate for beneficial impact amongst socially excluded groups it is apparent that the Internet is not just providing wider opportunities; these opportunities are actively being seized by socially excluded groups.

 

Keywords: Social exclusion, digital divide, Internet use, policy impact, benefits of ICT

 

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Journal Article

"Mobile" e‑Government Options: Between Technology‑driven and User‑centric  pp63-70

Pierre Rossel, Matthias Finger, Gianluca Misurac

© Jan 2007 Volume 4 Issue 2, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp49 - 94

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Abstract

This paper is about exploring mobile e‑Government issues by analysing their historical evolution and illustrating some concrete activities, first in the initial phase, then through more recent projects, with the idea of capturing some attributes of its development trend. The objective is to propose a view on m‑Government, which can be both compatible with fieldwork findings and overall information and communication technology dynamics. We thus suggest a remapping of the m‑Government domain, so as to establish key priorities, eventually helping improve policy‑planning capabilities in this area. Our main hypothesis is that m‑Government should not be too specific an area of e‑Government (limited to the notion of mobile access), but on the contrary take upon the current dominant movement in favour of mobile technology usages, and steer experiments and initiatives in a way that ultimately better benefits, and even empowers the users and citizens in their various flexibility needs.

 

Keywords: information and communication technologies, mobile e-Government, mobility, decentralisation, impact, foresight

 

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Journal Article

Public Service Reform through e‑Government: a Case Study of 'e‑Tax' in Japan  pp135-146

Akemi Takeoka Chatfield

© Apr 2009 Volume 7 Issue 2, ECEG 2007, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp123 - 208

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Abstract

There is a growing interest in the debate over whether or not e‑government has a transformational impact on government performance, governance, and public service, as we addressed this very issue at the 2007 ECEG. However, e‑government research results on the transformational impact are mixed. This may be an apt reflection of either the early stages of e‑government development or the newness of e‑government research field or both. Our research goal as scholars of e‑government must be to penetrate appearances to ascertain whatever lessons and meanings might lie beneath. This paper is an initial attempt toward achieving this goal. The main objective of this paper is to examine the relationship between public service reform through e‑government and actual government performance. We achieve this objective through a multi‑method approach, including a case study of Japan's National Tax Agency (NTA)`s sophisticated e‑government initiative: an integrated "e‑Tax" system networking the NTA with local tax offices throughout Japan. The "E‑Tax" provides a citizen‑centric, online income and other tax returns filing and payment services for individuals and corporations. A preliminary case analysis provides evidence in support of the transformational impact of e‑Tax on NTA performance. This paper makes an important contribution to the growing e‑government research literature on the transformational impact of e‑government particularly on service process reform.

 

Keywords: transformational impact of e-government, public service reform, electronic tax filing, case study, National Tax Agency, Japan

 

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Journal Article

Developing Administrative Law into Handling the Challenges of Digital Government in Denmark  pp136-146

Hanne Marie Motzfeldt, Ayo Næsborg-Andersen

© Oct 2018 Volume 16 Issue 2, Editor: Dr Carl Erik Moe, pp87 - 146

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Abstract

Denmark is far in developing Digital Government. Two essential challenges have, however, emerged. First, the use of information and communication technology (ICT) has caused unlawful administration in some areas due to deficient and faulty programming, in some cases violating the very core of rule of law. This unwanted side effect of digitalisation has been counteracted by a development of new principles of Danish administrative law; administrative law by design and the requirement for a good administration impact assessment. Administrative law by design imposes a duty on public authorities to apply a value‑based approach and to ensure relevant legislation and unwritten principles of public administrative law are embedded into the design of ICT. Good administration impact assessment entails a requirement for mapping all relevant legislation and principles of administrative law as part of the development of a given technology, if it is to be used by public authorities. Second, a major challenge is the skidding of control and insight as the digitalisation transition progresses and the technologies used develops. Some Danish authorities have already lost the oversight, the knowledge and the control of the systems used within their areas of administration, as also described in this article. During the summer of 2017 Danish administrative law might have adjusted to this challenge as well. The Parliamentary Ombudsman stated that in some cases the explicit acceptance of the democratically legitimised parliament, in other words legislation, is needed, if private companies are to develop and operate technologies used in the public sector. The aim of this article is to give a brief description of these two challenges caused by digitalisation and to hopefully serve as inspiration for others facing similar challenges and to give a more comprehensive insight in the subsequent development of Danish administrative law.

 

Keywords: Public-private partnership, outsourcing, Rule of law, e-government, Digital Government, the Danish Parliamentary Ombudsman, Administrative law by design, digitalisation, administrative law, good administrative impact assessment.

 

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Journal Article

The Link between the Conceptualization of eGovernment and its Perceived Impacts: an Exploratory Empirical Study in Kenya  pp161-174

Nixon Ochara-Muganda, Jean-Paul Van Belle

© Dec 2010 Volume 8 Issue 2, ECEG Conference Issue, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp83 - 235

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Abstract

This paper examines how eGovernment is conceptualized and the possible relationship with the expected impacts of eGovernment in a developing world context. The aim is to shed some light on why eGovernment initiatives often fail in developing world contexts. This research was based on an exhaustive survey among government agencies and consultants in Kenya. The dimension of eGovernment impacts was initially operationalized in terms of connectivity, openness, efficiency and effectiveness. Government conceptualizations could be classified under tool view, proxy view, ensemble view, computational view and nominal view. Interestingly, the empirical data yielded very different impact factors than originally envisaged, which were enhanced interactions and accessibility, enhanced cooperation and awareness, a better connected public administration and enhanced citizen opportunities. Canonical function analysis found a supply‑side focus which linked connected government to the conceptualization of eGovernment as an Evolving Artifact. The main contribution of this paper lies in highlighting the fact that the implementation of western information technologies in developing countries will be shaped by how their impacts are perceived. Thus both purveyors of the technologies and researchers can be made aware that, because of the very different expectations and contexts, these technologies may be conceptualized differently than in developed countries. In addition, the paper demonstrates a practical research approach to assist in uncovering these conceptualizations more explicitly.

 

Keywords: conceptualizing eGovernment, developing countries, impacts, Kenya

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 7 Issue 2, ECEG 2007 / Apr 2009  pp123‑208

Editor: Frank Bannister

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Editorial

At the time of writing this editorial, I have just returned from the ICEGOV conference on e‑government and e‑governance in Ankara. In addition to excellent Turkish hospitality, the conference threw up a couple of lively debates in the parallel sessions. A good, well behaved academic argument can be one of the most productive and rewarding parts of a conference. Unfortunately good debates tend to be relatively rare as Session Chairs, armed with a “time up” card and a severe set of instructions from the organisers give each presenter their statutory 20 minutes plus five for questions before it is time for “next please”. Occasionally a discussion will continue during coffee or lunch, but sometimes debates only occur because the next speaker doesn’t turn up.

In Ankara, one of these debates was about what was meant by “e‑governance”? During the discussion, it quickly became clear that not only was there no agreement in the room on what the term meant, but also that some of those present were even unclear in their own minds what the difference was between e‑ government and e‑governance. The sight of academics disagreeing about anything and everything, including semantics, is as old as the first university seminar, but semantics matter in academia and the absence of clarity on what is meant by e‑governance was somewhat disconcerting. Rightly or wrongly, I got the feeling that many in the room had not actually given the matter much thought.

This lack of clarity is not an unknown phenomenon. Information systems have an unhappy history of relabelling basic concepts even though, in many cases, nothing fundamental in the technology has changed. Sometimes terms outlive their usefulness and have to be replaced and/or upgraded. On other occasions it seems more like an attempt to resuscitate a floundering field. Recently, even the term “e‑ government” has been under attack. At a meeting I attended last December, one of those present even suggested, I think only partially in jest, that we needed an exit strategy for e‑government. Various replacements are mooted including “transformational government”, “digital government” (popular in the US), “government 2.0” and, more recently, e‑governance. The latter is an unfortunate suggestion, because government and governance have quite different meanings. Furthermore, governance is a notoriously contentious, not to say downright slippery, subject even before putting “e‑“ in front of it.

Not surprisingly, a number of scholars have addressed the difference between e‑governance and e‑ government (including in this journal). While this is of some help, there are just too many interpretations of the expression. Definitions of e‑governance range from an information age model of governance to a “commitment” to use ICT to, inter alia, enhance human dignity and deliver economic development. Other authors more or less equate e‑governance with e‑democracy (in one article published in a leading journal a few years ago, the word “e‑governance” appears in the title and nowhere else in the text!). All this does not help when attending a conference presentation with “e‑governance” in the title although it may give a frisson of excitement as we await the definition that the presenter has in mind.

In a simple search on the web, it is possible to find quite a large number of scholarly papers on e‑ governance. Google throws up over four and half thousand of them. Prior to writing this, I scanned about a dozen of these. While a few differentiated between e‑government and e‑governance, none of them gave a satisfactory account of the material difference between e‑governance and plain old non “e‑“ governance. Such an article may be out there, but I suspect that there is a gap in the market for a really good paper on this topic.

Whatever the definition(s), it behoves academics and scholars to be clear in what they say. Muddling up two quite different concepts is not good scholarship. There is also a need to put some clear blue water between e‑governance and governance generally. ICT certainly enables us to do many things that were heretofore impractical thus reifying hitherto theoretical or abstract problems. Whether it creates new problems is not so obvious. There is plenty of scope for some further contributions to this debate.

 

Keywords: business process improvement, business process reengineering, case study, digital democracy, digital services, e-business, e-commerce, e-democracy, e-governance, e-government services, electronic tax filing, engagement, enterprise information architecture, e-participation, e-procurement, e-revenue, e-tax, e-transactions, e-transparency, e-trust, information technology, internal stakeholders, international tax strategy, Japan, local e-government, National Tax Agency, organizational (re-)design, permanent establishment (PE), public service reform, Romanian e-government, socio-technical systems design, systems architecture, telehealthcare, transfer pricing, transformational impact of e-government

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 16 Issue 2 / Oct 2018  pp87‑146

Editor: Dr Carl Erik Moe

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Keywords: task characteristics, business intelligence success, public sector, quantitative research, Adoption, non-adoption, channel choice, citizens, Germany, qualitative research, multichannel management, citizen multichannel behavior, action research, collaboration; caseworkers, Udbetaling Danmark, Public-private partnership, outsourcing, Rule of law, e-government, Digital Government, the Danish Parliamentary Ombudsman, Administrative law by design, digitalisation, administrative law, good administrative impact assessment, , crisis management, leadership, information management, situational awareness, crisis response, crisis management system

 

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