The Electronic Journal of e-Government publishes perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Government

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Journal Article

MIDEM. Models for Interactive Decision Making  pp55-64

Auli Keskinen

© Jun 2004 Volume 2 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 74

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Abstract

This article is a broad reflection on e‑Democracy models used in several countries throughout the last 20 years. It is based on hands‑on experience gained through experiments and projects with local authorities conducted since the days of videotex. In essence, ICT can be utilised to radically transform the shape of political decision making into a citizen‑oriented vision. The realisation of this vision must involve the participation of people and continuous deliberation between citizens and political decision makers. Although e‑Democracy is considered a way for creating genuine dialogue between interest groups in a society in the future, the technology needs motivated communities to ensure self‑ governance is developed. If used properly ICT will transform our understanding of political action.

 

Keywords: e-Democracy, decision making, ICT, deliberative poll, televote, electronic town meeting, funnel model, citizen jury, referendum

 

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Journal Article

Factors for Successful e‑Government Adoption: a Conceptual Framework  pp63-76

Vinod Kumar, Bhasker Mukerji, Irfan Butt

© Aug 2007 Volume 5 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 95

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Abstract

Canada has been the world's leader in e‑Government maturity for the last five years. The global average for government website usage by citizens is about 30%. In Canada, this statistic is over 51%. The vast majority of Canadians visit government websites to obtain information, rather than interacting or transacting with the government. It seems that the rate of adoption of e‑Government has globally fallen below expectations although some countries are doing better than others. Clearly, a better understanding of why and how citizens use government websites, and their general dispositions towards e‑Government is an important research issue. This paper initiates discussion of this issue by proposing a conceptual model of e‑Government adoption that places users as the focal point for e‑Government adoption strategy.

 

Keywords: customer orientation, e-Government, adoption, model, Canada

 

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Journal Article

e‑Democracy in Australia: the Challenge of Evolving a Successful Model  pp107-116

Jenny Backhouse

© Dec 2007 Volume 5 Issue 2, ECEG 2007, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp95 - 224

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Abstract

This paper examines the current status of e‑democracy initiatives in Australia and considers the factors that might contribute to the evolution of a successful model of e‑democracy in the Australian context. In particular, it examines whether any analogies can be drawn from the world of e‑business which has transitioned from an over‑hyped boom and then bust in the early years into a steadier and sustained growth in more recent times. The paper concludes that, despite some valiant efforts by e‑democracy enthusiasts, we have yet to hit on an e‑ democracy model that truly engages the Australian populace. Nevertheless, the analogy from e‑business suggests that, given the right model(s) and the right environment, it can still be possible to deliver real benefits via e‑democracy.

 

Keywords: e-democracy, e-business, model, Australia

 

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Journal Article

Understanding Citizen's Continuance Intention to Use e‑Government Website: a Composite View of Technology Acceptance Model and Computer Self‑Efficacy  pp55-64

Sivaporn Wangpipatwong, Wichian Chutimaskul, Borworn Papasratorn

© Apr 2008 Volume 6 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 64

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Abstract

This study aims to understand the fundamental factors influencing the citizen's continuance intention to use e‑ Government websites by using the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) as a based theoretical model. Computer self‑ efficacy is adopted as an additional factor that influences the citizen's continuance intention to use e‑Government websites. To empirically test the proposed research model, the web‑based survey was employed. The participants consisted of 614 country‑wide citizens with at least a bachelor's degree and an experience with e‑Government websites. Regression analysis was conducted to test the model. The results revealed that perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use of e‑Government websites and citizen's computer self‑efficacy directly enhanced citizen's continuance intention to use e‑Government websites. In addition, perceived ease of use of e‑Government websites indirectly enhanced citizen's continuance intention through perceived usefulness.

 

Keywords: e-Government, technology acceptance model, computer self-efficacy, continuance intention

 

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Journal Article

e‑Government and Technology Acceptance: The Case of the Implementation of Section 508 Guidelines for Websites  pp87-98

Paul T. Jaeger, Miriam Matteson

© Jan 2009 Volume 7 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 122

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Abstract

This paper examines the relevance of the Technology Acceptance Model for e‑Government websites at federal government level in the United States through an exploratory research study. Various unfunded government mandates over the past several years have required agencies to create websites, put services on the sites, and make them accessible to citizens, and the federal e‑Government now includes tens of thousands of sites. Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act, for example, was passed to ensure e‑Government sites would be accessible to persons with disabilities. By studying the implementation of the requirements of Section 508 through a number of data collection techniques and in terms of the Technology Acceptance Model, this paper seeks to use this particular law as an example through which to better understand the processes by which government agencies adopt e‑Government requirements and the actions that government managers can take to improve the implementation of such adoption.

 

Keywords: e-Government, technology acceptance model, accessibility, Section 508, disability, public servants, websites

 

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Journal Article

Harnessing e‑Government Adoption in the SADC Region: a Conceptual Underpinning  pp13-22

Kelvin Joseph Bwalya, Mike Healy

© Mar 2010 Volume 8 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 82

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Abstract

There has recently been an escalation of e‑Government initiatives in the Southern African Development Community (SADC) region, with South Africa, Mauritius, Seychelles and Botswana leading the way towards this cause. Evidence indicates e‑Government implementation projects in this region either fail or succeed. Therefore it is important that before actual implementation is commissioned, there is need to understand the different challenges that come with e‑Government implementations such as investment risks, failure to be adopted by the general citizenry, abandoning already‑commissioned e‑Government activities, and so forth. uch problems can be avoided by putting in place a properly and carefully authored e‑Government adoption strategy that takes care of the local context and the multi‑dimensionality of e‑Government. This paper, with strong reference to Davis' 1989 Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) theoretical underpinning, proposes a conceptual e‑Government adoption model that may be commensurate with promoting the growth of e‑ Government in the SADC region. However, the limitation of this proposed model is that it has not been empirically tested and leaves room for its further validation. The paper follows up on the status of e‑Government implementation in the SADC region by presenting two case studies that detail what interventions and initiatives have been put in place to encourage e‑Government in Botswana and Zambia.

 

Keywords: e-government policies, adoption model, Zambia, Botswana, SADC

 

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Journal Article

The Acceptance of the e‑Filing System by Malaysian Taxpayers: A Simplified Model  pp23-32

Anna Che Azmi, Ng Lee Bee

© Mar 2010 Volume 8 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 82

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Abstract

The e‑filing system is an important e‑government service in Malaysia. This paper investigates the factors that lead to the acceptance of e‑filing among taxpayers by using TAM. This study proposes a model consisting of three constructs, which are perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use and perceived risk. The model proposed by this study is a simpler model compared to other studies on e‑filing. The confirmatory factor analysis shows that the model is an adequate fit. Based on the data collected from 166 respondents, the results showed that the proposed model explained up to 61% of the variance in behavioral intention. All of the variables significantly influence behavioral intention. The perceived risk construct has a negative association with the perceived usefulness construct. However, there is no significant association between the perceived risk and perceived ease of use constructs.

 

Keywords: taxation, e-filing, technology acceptance model, perceived risk, e-government, Malaysia

 

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Journal Article

Factors Influencing Citizen Adoption of SMS‑Based e‑Government Services  pp55-70

Tony Dwi Susantoand Robert Goodwin

© Mar 2010 Volume 8 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 82

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Abstract

This paper identifies the factors that determine citizens' acceptance of SMS‑based e‑government services. It reports on a web‑based survey, paper‑based questionnaires, and phone‑call interviews that collected 159 responses from 25 countries. The results indicate that there are fifteen perceptions toward using SMS‑based e‑government services that may influence citizens to use or to reject the services: perceived ease of use; perceived efficiency in time and distance; perceived value for money; perceived usefulness; perceived responsiveness; perceived convenience; perceived relevance, quality and reliability of the information; trust in the SMS technology; perceived risk to user privacy; perceived reliability of the mobile network and the SMS‑based system; trust in government and perceived quality of public services; perceived risk to money; perceived availability of device and infrastructure; perceived compatibility; and perceived self‑efficacy in using SMS. Whether or not a citizen adopts an SMS‑based e‑government service is influenced by these perceptions. To increase the acceptance of SMS‑based e‑government services, the systems should address all of these belief factors. An intensive advertising campaign for the services in all mass media channels is critically important to make citizens aware of and to provide detailed knowledge about the services. The advertising campaign should involve people who influence individuals' decision making. These people include friends, family, teachers, experts, public figures, and government officials. This study found that Notification services are the most frequently used followed by Pull SMS, Listen, and Transaction SMS services. Notification services could be an appropriate starting point for governments who want to establish SMS‑based e‑government services.

 

Keywords: e-government, SMS, acceptance factors, six Level model of SMS-based e-government, technology adoption, users' behaviour, public services

 

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