The Electronic Journal of e-Government publishes perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Government

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Journal Article

Is e‑democracy more than democratic? ‑ An examination of the implementation of socially sustainable values in e‑democratic processes  pp84-94

Gustav Lidén

© Oct 2012 Volume 10 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 94

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Abstract

A growing literature tries to contribute to a more balanced view of the concept of e‑democracy. However, one seldom discussed aspect is the concept’s inadequate dimension on what a desirable development of society consists of. By adding certain values, today most pronounced in the theory of social sustainability, this article examines the awareness of such in three e‑democratic projects in Swedish municipalities. This is carried out through a qualitative inquiry that uses different types of data and that regards social sustainability as an ongoing process that is suitable to be analysed in relation to other structures in society. The empirical part reveals different important topics. First it shows that the conscious¬ness of socially sustainable values varies between the examined cases. Second, this variation can be due to both the varying success of e‑democracy and to conditions inside the political organizations. In conclusion, this paper reveals that the consequence of adding a socially sustainable perspective to e‑democracy is that it provides adequate opportunities for analysing social development without missing out qualities that are desired in a democratic society.

 

Keywords: e-democracy, social sustainability, democratic theory, political participation, political equality, Sweden

 

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Journal Article

E‑government Use and Citizen Empowerment: Examining the Effects Of Online Information On Political Efficacy  pp52-64

Chungpin Lee, Tong-yi Huang

© Nov 2014 Volume 12 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 125

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Abstract

Abstract: Although the government has made enormous investments in the area of e‑government, whether these efforts do indeed promote greater citizen participation is still being debated between those optimistic and those pessimistic about ICTs potential to change the way people interact with government. This study hopes to bring forth a new perspective, by injecting new empirical evidence, to revitalize discussions between opposing views on ICTs, by arguing that information technology could elevate poli tical efficacyŽ and indirectly enhance political participation. This research attempts to answer the following questions: Does e‑government use increase citizens political efficacy?Ž What are the different influences e‑government mechanisms have on int ernal and external Internet political efficacy?Ž. A regression analysis was used as the method for analyzing data collected from a telephone survey of all Taiwanese citizens above the age of twelve, and with experiences in the use of e‑government services . The results show that factors which affect internal and external Internet political efficacy are different. The enhancement of external Internet political efficacy factors are not directly related to the e‑government mechanism, but are related to citize ns trust in e‑government, political trust, and external political efficacy. Whereas information update speed by e‑government and citizen usage needs for e‑government factors, affect internal Internet political efficacy. The conclusions reached, in theor y, would provide a new angle of reflection and research for the debate on the influences of technology use on civil participation, by technological optimists and pessimists. This new angle suggests that the effects of technology use are on the perceptions and attitudes related to civil participation, and not directly related to participation behaviors. In practice, this generates another urgent reason for the government to invest additional resources in the elevation of internet information quality.

 

Keywords: Keywords: political efficacy, e-government, citizen empowerment, political participation, use of e-government, information quality

 

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Journal Article

Citizens4Citizens: Mapping Participatory Practices on the Internet  pp99-112

Albert Meijer, Nils Burger, Wolfgang Ebbers

© Jan 2009 Volume 7 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 122

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Abstract

Many important forms of public participation take place in interactions between citizens. Studying these interactions is crucial for understanding e‑governance, defined as steering in the public domain. The new forms of public participations can be labeled Citizens2Citizens interactions (C2C). Citizens use the Internet to facilitate policy participation (meant to support or undermine government policies), political participation (directed at influencing political decision‑making and agenda‑setting) and social participation (to increase social capital). Attention for these forms of digital participation coincides with the rise of a new set of Web applications which are grouped under the label 'Web 2.0'. This paper is an attempt to conceptualize and categorize the wide variety of types and forms of C2C to provide a basis for a further development of this new research field. We do not claim that our exploration will lead to a final and complete description of C2C; we merely aim to present an overview of the diversity of forms of C2C initiatives that are taking place in the digital world. The argument we are putting forward is that new technologies offer new venues for participating and that these new practices will constitute both a replication of and an addition to existing offline practices of public participation. Our explorative research of C2C initiatives results in a map of political, policy and social participation. This map of C2C initiatives can provide insights in the variety of Internet practices and help subsequent researches in their selection of initiatives for in‑depth studies. Additionally, our research results in an exploration of the implications the analyzed initiatives can have for participation in the public sector.

 

Keywords: political participation, policy participation, social participation, e-governance

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 7 Issue 1 / Jan 2009  pp1‑122

Editor: Frank Bannister

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Keywords: accessibility, barriers, BRAIN, business process, business rule, capacity for getting ahead, citizen participation, community building, coping and sense making strategies, developing nations, digital divide, disability, disenfranchisement, eDemocracy, e-governance, e-Government adoption, e-government readiness, Egypt, end-user approaches, e-readiness, information and communication technology, information dissemination, internet voting, IT transfer, KedaiKom, Malaysia, municipalities, policy participation, political participation, public participation, public sector, public servants, Section 508, service delivery, social and digital inclusion, social consequences, social participation, strategic planning, Switzerland, technology acceptance model, Telecentres, turnout, websites

 

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