The Electronic Journal of e-Government publishes perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Government

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Journal Article

Evaluating Global e‑Government Sites: A View using Web Diagnostic Tools  pp105-114

Jyoti Choudrie, Gheorgita Ghinea Vishanth Weerakkody

© Oct 2004 Volume 2 Issue 2, ECEG 2004, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp75 - 146

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Abstract

Several governments across the world have embraced the digital revolution and continue to take advantage of the information and communication facilities offered by the Internet to offer public services. Conversely, citizens' awareness and expectations of Internet based online‑public‑services have also increased in recent times. Although the numbers of the different national e‑Government web portals have increased rapidly in the last three years, the success of these portals will largely depend on their accessibility, quality and privacy. This paper reports the results of an evaluative study of a cross‑ section of e‑Government portals from these three perspectives, using a common set of performance metrics and Web diagnostic engines. Results show that not only are there wide variations in the spectrum of information and services provided by these portals, but that significant work still needs to be undertaken in order to make the portals examples of 'best practice' e‑Government services.

 

Keywords: e-Government, accessibility, quality, privacy

 

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Journal Article

Trust and the Taxman: a Study of the Irish Revenue's Website Service Quality  pp127-134

Regina Connolly

© Dec 2007 Volume 5 Issue 2, ECEG 2007, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp95 - 224

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Abstract

This paper describes an ongoing study into the quality of service provided by the Irish Revenue Commisioners' on‑line tax filing and collection system. The Irish Revenue On‑Line Service (ROS) site has won several awards. In this study, a version of the widely used SERVQUAL measuring instrument, adapted for use with on‑line services, has been modified for the specific case of ROS. The theory behind this instrument is set out, the particular problems of evaluating revenue collecting on‑line are examined and the rationale for this approach is explained.

 

Keywords: e-government, taxation, on-line, quality of service, SERVQUAL

 

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Journal Article

Factors Affecting the Adoption of e‑Government in Kuwait: A Qualitative Study  pp84-102

Hussain Alenezi, Ali Tarhini, Ra'ed Masa'deh, Ali Alalwan, Nabeel Al-Qirim

© Mar 2017 Volume 15 Issue 2, Editor: Carl Erik Moe, pp57 - 154

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Abstract

Previous research on information quality and organizations performance focuses on private sectors and pays little attention to governments and public organizations. To the best of the researchers’ knowledge, e‑Government success literature has rarely investigated information quality as a contributor to the success of e‑Government initiatives in Kuwait. This paper aims to understand the factors that may influence or hinder for enabling e‑Government strategic benefits in Kuwait. Data were collected from 31 employees through one‑on‑one interviews at three e‑Government Kuwaiti agencies namely, Ministry of Justice, Ministry of Finance and Public Authority for Civil Communication. The study findings revealed that several themes (i.e. information quality, strategic benefits, and institutional values) were observed to achieve better e‑Government Benefits. The research also reveals some new drivers (Cost saving and customer satisfaction) and barriers (e.g. Nepotism and Wasta) to improving organizational performance. These results and their implications to both theory and practice are described.

 

Keywords: Information Quality, Organizational performance, E-government, Qualitative research, Kuwait, Arab World.

 

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Journal Article

Is e‑democracy more than democratic? ‑ An examination of the implementation of socially sustainable values in e‑democratic processes  pp84-94

Gustav Lidén

© Oct 2012 Volume 10 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 94

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Abstract

A growing literature tries to contribute to a more balanced view of the concept of e‑democracy. However, one seldom discussed aspect is the concept’s inadequate dimension on what a desirable development of society consists of. By adding certain values, today most pronounced in the theory of social sustainability, this article examines the awareness of such in three e‑democratic projects in Swedish municipalities. This is carried out through a qualitative inquiry that uses different types of data and that regards social sustainability as an ongoing process that is suitable to be analysed in relation to other structures in society. The empirical part reveals different important topics. First it shows that the conscious¬ness of socially sustainable values varies between the examined cases. Second, this variation can be due to both the varying success of e‑democracy and to conditions inside the political organizations. In conclusion, this paper reveals that the consequence of adding a socially sustainable perspective to e‑democracy is that it provides adequate opportunities for analysing social development without missing out qualities that are desired in a democratic society.

 

Keywords: e-democracy, social sustainability, democratic theory, political participation, political equality, Sweden

 

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Journal Article

E‑government Use and Citizen Empowerment: Examining the Effects Of Online Information On Political Efficacy  pp52-64

Chungpin Lee, Tong-yi Huang

© Nov 2014 Volume 12 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 125

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Abstract

Abstract: Although the government has made enormous investments in the area of e‑government, whether these efforts do indeed promote greater citizen participation is still being debated between those optimistic and those pessimistic about ICTs potential to change the way people interact with government. This study hopes to bring forth a new perspective, by injecting new empirical evidence, to revitalize discussions between opposing views on ICTs, by arguing that information technology could elevate poli tical efficacyŽ and indirectly enhance political participation. This research attempts to answer the following questions: Does e‑government use increase citizens political efficacy?Ž What are the different influences e‑government mechanisms have on int ernal and external Internet political efficacy?Ž. A regression analysis was used as the method for analyzing data collected from a telephone survey of all Taiwanese citizens above the age of twelve, and with experiences in the use of e‑government services . The results show that factors which affect internal and external Internet political efficacy are different. The enhancement of external Internet political efficacy factors are not directly related to the e‑government mechanism, but are related to citize ns trust in e‑government, political trust, and external political efficacy. Whereas information update speed by e‑government and citizen usage needs for e‑government factors, affect internal Internet political efficacy. The conclusions reached, in theor y, would provide a new angle of reflection and research for the debate on the influences of technology use on civil participation, by technological optimists and pessimists. This new angle suggests that the effects of technology use are on the perceptions and attitudes related to civil participation, and not directly related to participation behaviors. In practice, this generates another urgent reason for the government to invest additional resources in the elevation of internet information quality.

 

Keywords: Keywords: political efficacy, e-government, citizen empowerment, political participation, use of e-government, information quality

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 5 Issue 2, ECEG 2007 / Dec 2007  pp95‑224

Editor: Frank Bannister

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Editorial

This issue contains a selection of the best papers from the 2007 European Conference on e‑Government which took place in The Hague . Our host was Den Haagse Hogeschool, which is housed in a building which can best be described as a series of large ellipses piled on top of one another. Finding a given room on a given level involved a decision as to whether to go clockwise or anticlockwise round this structure and there was plenty of empirical evidence of the validity of the *buttered toast law as the later one was for a presentation, the more likely one seemed to be to go the longer way around.

As usual with this issue, there are a large number of articles and they come from many countries. A number of contributors consider various aspects of government portals and on‑line services. Aykut Arslan looks at the impact of ICT on local government in Turkey , concluding that although progress has been made, there is much to be done, especially in moving beyond efficiency to broader goals of inclusion and democracy. On the other side of the continent, Karin Furuli and Sigrun Kongsrud compare and contrast government portals in Demark and Norway . The framework that they develop for doing this may be of interest to other researchers and has wide potential application. In their article, Ralph Feenstra, Marijn Janssen and René Wagenaar (who sadly died in 2007), examine the question of composition methods for web based government services where there are multiple actors. Composition is the process of combining several services (usually from different suppliers) necessary for the completion of a single task and evaluating methods of doing this is non trivial. Regina Connolly's article focuses on the factors that influence the take up and effectiveness of Ireland 's Revenue Online Service tax payment system and provides several useful insights that could be applied elsewhere. Alea Fairchild and Bruno de Vuyst consider another aspect of government service, the Belgian Government Interoperability Framework (BELGIF) and look at the problems of interoperability in a country with its own particular administrative and political complexities.

Document management is a topic that to date has received little attention in the e‑government literature. Two papers here contribute to making up for this deficiency. For anybody who would like a primer as well as an interesting model, the article by Raphael Kunis, Gudula Rünger and Michael Schwind is an informative read. Mitja Decman also considers the matter of government documents, this time from the perspective of archiving and long term storage. As well as being another good overview of the issues involved, the case for having confidence in such forms of storage is well argued.

The conference has always attracted a number of contributions on electronic voting and e‑democracy In their article, Orhan and Deniz Cetinkaya give a sweeping overview of e‑voting, arguing that there is sometimes a lack of clarity in terminology and suggesting that appropriate levels of verification and validation should be applied to e‑voting in different situations. Mark Liptrott's article on e‑voting presents a rather different perspective, examining the successes and failures of the 2003 e‑voting experiment in the UK . His conclusion is that government will need to be proactive and learn the lessons of Roger's diffusion theory if it is going to get widespread public acceptance of this technology. In a different part of the e‑democracy forest, Jenny Backhouse arrives as a somewhat similar conclusion, that engagement with e‑democracy in Australia seeks unlikely to break out spontaneously with given models. Using analogies from e‑business, she concludes, however, that e‑democracy is here to stay whether we like it or not!

Finally, two papers with broader themes. Albert Meijer opens his article with the provocative question; “Are all countries heading for similar political systems in the information age?” He then looks at this question using empirical research in the USA and The Netherlands which suggests that convergence is not happening in quite the way some expect. Mary Griffiths looks at something quite different, the South Australian Oxygen programme (designed to connect the X and Y generations) which seeks to equip young people for civil engagement via electronic media. The results of this experiment are refreshingly positive and again, as in other articles in this issue, there are lessons for a wider world.

 

Keywords: archiving, Australia, Borger.dk, citizen portal, collaboration, diffusion, digital archive, digital preservation, document management systems, document processing, e-administration, e-business model, e-democracy, e-government security, electronic data, electronic record management, e-municipality, e-participation, e-Turkey, evaluation, e-voting, hierarchical government processes, institutional differences, interoperability, multi-actor networks, Mypage, online public services, outsourcing, peer-managed intranets, pilot scheme, political accountability, Protocols, public policy process, public value, quality of service, record keeping, SERVQUAL, social value, standards, taxation, Transferability, trust, Turkish e-governments, Turkish local governments, UGC, validation, verification, virtual village, web service composition

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 15 Issue 2 / Mar 2017  pp57‑154

Editor: Carl Erik Moe

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Editorial

Chief Editor

carl erik moe Dr Carl Erik Moe  is a Professor of Information Systems at the University of Agder, Norway. After serving as Head of Department (HOD) for a number of years, he is back to research and teaching. As HOD he took a leading role developing graduate programs in both Information Systems and Health Informatics, and PhD program in Information Systems as well as promoting and generating research collaboration with local government and industry.

Carl Erik has served as Program Chair of IFIP EGOV 2012. He is an active reviewer for several academic journals. He was one of the founding members of the Scandinavian Workshop on e‑Government, of which he is still very much involved and he has served as leader of the Norwegian Council for Information Science.

Carl Erik’s current research interests include e‑Government covering issues such as Procurement of IS and Policies and Strategies for Digital Government including Open Government and ICT4D, and it includes e‑Health covering issues such as IS in Social Work, Telecare and Information Systems in Integrated Care.

Carl Erik served as Associate Editor on EJEG for several years before taking over as Editor. He welcomes both empirical and conceptual work and case studies with practical implications, and he encourages work on emerging topics and open and smart government. His ambition is to keep up the good academic quality of the journal at the same time as encouraging work in progress and establishing a case section in the journal.

 

Keywords: online public services, digital divide, logistic regression analysis, Enterprise Architecture, Public Sector, Systematic Literature Review, Government Enterprise Architecture, Technology Acceptance, e-procurement, survey, private firms, Belgium, Social Sensors, Open Governance, Crowdsourcing, e-participation, Trust, Information Quality, Organizational performance, E-government, Qualitative research, Kuwait, Arab World

 

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