The Electronic Journal of e-Government publishes perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Government

For general enquiries email administrator@ejeg.com

Click here to see other Scholarly Electronic Journals published by API
For a range of research text books on this and complimentary topics visit the Academic Bookshop

Information about the European Conference on Digital Government is available here

 

Journal Article

FRAMES — A Risk Assessment Framework for e‑Services  pp21-30

Adrianos Evangelidis

© Jun 2004 Volume 2 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 74

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

e‑Government projects are expected to increase efficiency and quality of government services, whilst decreasing the costs. Unfortunately though, together with its perceived positive potential, e‑Government also entails risks. It is expected that the employment of proper risk assessment methods in the management of such projects will reduce the threats imposed by the various risks that surround these projects. This paper discusses about risk in e‑Government and provides a high‑level e‑ Government risk factor classification. Furthermore, this article proposes a novel risk assessment framework for e‑Services in the public administration.

 

Keywords: e-Government, e-Service, Risk, Risk Assessment, Frameworks

 

Share |

Journal Article

Developing Generic Shared Services for e‑Government  pp31-38

Marijn Janssen, René Wagenaar

© Jun 2004 Volume 2 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 74

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Currently e‑Government initiatives have a highly fragmented nature and are hardly coordinated. An architectural approach aimed at reusing components as shared services can support government agencies in the implementation of their e‑Government initiatives. In this paper we describe research aimed at identifying and prioritising the importance of generic services that can be shared among public agencies. Generic shared services are identified and prioritised by technical experts and government representatives using a group support system session. This has resulted in an action plan to implement the services and use them as part of future e‑Government projects.

 

Keywords: Architecture, group support system, e-Government, shared services, data centres, shared service centre

 

Share |

Journal Article

The e‑Citizen as talk, as text and as technology: CRM and e‑Government  pp147-158

Paul Richter, James Cornford, Ian McLoughlin

© Oct 2004 Volume 2 Issue 3, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp147 - 218

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Public service transformation in the UK is being carried out in the name of the citizen and these changes — specifically those labelled as 'e‑Government' — bring with them the prospect of a significant shift in the nature of the relationship between government and its citizens. Of particular interest is the notion of the e‑Citizen, set against a contemporary public management backdrop featuring customer‑centric discoursesmetaphors, organisational transformation and ICT‑intensive 'private‑sector' business solutions. This paper focuses on a pilot study concerned with exploring the nature and role of socio‑technical and discursive factors which may be implicated in the 'shaping' of the e‑Citizen around the introduction of 'customer relationship management' (CRM) systems at a local government level. The research design draws on 'social shaping of technology' approaches and emphasises the significance of discursive events in these shaping processes. Preliminary findings suggest that citizen‑users of the new face to face access channel within local e‑government are being configured primarily as 'customers' which we suggest has significant implications for the traditional relationship between individuals and the institutions of government.

 

Keywords: e-government, citizen, customer service, discourse, technology

 

Share |

Journal Article

Impacts of Internet use on Public Administration: A Case Study of the Brazilian Tax Administration  pp49-58

Maria Virginia de Vasconcellos, Maria das Graças Rua

© Jul 2005 Volume 3 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 58

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

This paper seeks to identify the effects of Internet used as a vehicle for sending federal tax returns through the RECEITANET program. The benefits that came out from security and costs reduction in the process of delivering tax returns are identified, as well as the impacts on Tax Administration (TA) and on the Treasury‑Taxpayer relationship.

 

Keywords: E-Government, G2C-Government to Citizen service, E-public service, IT application in Tax Administration, Transmitting Tax returns via Internet, Treasury-Taxpayer relationship, IT Evaluation

 

Share |

Journal Article

The Effectiveness of e‑Service in Local Government: A Case Study  pp157-166

Mehdi Asgarkhani

© Feb 2006 Volume 3 Issue 4, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp157 - 240

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

e‑Technology has become a catalyst for enabling more effective government through better access to services and the democratic process. As public interest in the Internet and e‑Technology solutions continues to grow, there is an increasing expectation that they will be utilised in national and local governments for not only more efficient governance but also improving public access to information and services. This paper, based on a case study discusses some of the key aspects of electronic government and e‑Service. It examines the value and the effectiveness of e‑Services within the public sector with a focus on four specific facets of effectiveness: the view of management and ICT strategists; social, cultural and ethical implications; the implications of lack of access to ICT; and the customers'citizens' view of the usefulness and success of e‑Service initiatives.

 

Keywords: e-Technologies, e-Service, e-Government, e-Readiness, Local Government

 

Share |

Journal Article

Stages of Growth in e‑Government: An Architectural Approach  pp193-200

Marijn Janssen, Anne Fleur van Veenstra

© Feb 2006 Volume 3 Issue 4, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp157 - 240

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Governmental agencies from all over the world are in various stages of development to migrate their traditional systems architectures to more horizontally and vertically integrated architectures. In this paper a stages of growth model for the development of information architectures for local governmental agencies is presented. By analyzing discontinuities in the architectures coordinating back and front office applications five stages are derived. The five‑stage model consists of 1) no integration, 2) one‑to‑one messaging, 3) warehouse, 4) broker and 5) orchestrated broker architecture. Public decision‑makers can use these stages as a guidance and direction in architecture development, to reduce the complexity of the progression of e‑government initiatives, to communicate changes to the rest of the organization and to provide milestones to evaluate and control cost of architecture development.

 

Keywords: Information architecture, local government, stage models, coordination, information broker, web service orchestration

 

Share |

Journal Article

Trust and the Taxman: a Study of the Irish Revenue's Website Service Quality  pp127-134

Regina Connolly

© Dec 2007 Volume 5 Issue 2, ECEG 2007, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp95 - 224

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

This paper describes an ongoing study into the quality of service provided by the Irish Revenue Commisioners' on‑line tax filing and collection system. The Irish Revenue On‑Line Service (ROS) site has won several awards. In this study, a version of the widely used SERVQUAL measuring instrument, adapted for use with on‑line services, has been modified for the specific case of ROS. The theory behind this instrument is set out, the particular problems of evaluating revenue collecting on‑line are examined and the rationale for this approach is explained.

 

Keywords: e-government, taxation, on-line, quality of service, SERVQUAL

 

Share |

Journal Article

Evaluating Web Service Composition Methods: the Need for Including Multi‑Actor Elements  pp153-164

Ralph W. Feenstra, Marijn Janssen, René W. Wagenaar

© Dec 2007 Volume 5 Issue 2, ECEG 2007, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp95 - 224

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

New systems can be designed by composing them out‑of‑existing software components which are accessible as web services and provided by the service providers. Governmental organizations can act as service providers by providing information or functionality like authenticating. The basic premise is that by reusing components, development and maintenance costs can be lowered and flexibility is created. As such, public agencies are looking for support to create new compositions. Several composition approaches can be found in the literature, however none of these evaluations take into account the e‑government specific requirements originating from the involvement of multiple parties having different interests. In this paper we present a composition evaluation approach which extends the existing evaluation approaches by including the multi‑actor dimension. We illustrate this method using an example. Further research is aimed at executing the proposed approach and comparing semantic and multi‑actor‑based compositions methods.

 

Keywords: web service, web service composition, evaluation, workshop, multi-actor networks

 

Share |