The Electronic Journal of e-Government publishes perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Government

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Journal Article

Examining the Barriers to e‑Government Adoption  pp113-122

Richard W. Schwester

© Jan 2009 Volume 7 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 122

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Abstract

e‑Government initially began as process where government entities developed websites and began populating these sites with information. After mastering this information dissemination aspect, government units moved toward processing online transactions. Subsequent to mastering transaction processing, governments moved across a continuum and engaged citizens online in a participatory framework; that is, offering Internet applications that connect citizens with public administrators, decision‑makers, and perhaps elected officials. While the subsequent progression and potential benefits of e‑Government applications are without limits, there are a number of barriers that impede the implementation of such applications. Using survey data collected by the International CityCounty Management Association (ICMA), this paper examines the factors that most impede the adoption of e‑Government applications. Central research questions include: what are the differences between municipalities that have comprehensive e‑ Government platforms and those that do not, and to what extent do certain barriers explain these differences? Multiple regression results indicate that e‑Government adoption is a function of financial, technical, and human resources. Holding all other factors constant, municipalities with higher operating budgets, more full‑time IT staff, and technical resources are more likely to implement a comprehensive e‑Government platform. Political support is a key and fairly robust determinant of municipal e‑Government adoption as well.

 

Keywords: e-Government adoption, municipalities, barriers, service delivery, information dissemination, citizen participation

 

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Journal Article

Guiding Integrated Service Delivery: Synthesizing and Embedding Principles Using Role‑Playing Games  pp83-92

Nitesh Bharosa, Marijn Janssen, Bram Klievink, Anne-Fleur van Veenstra, Sietse Overbeek

© Dec 2010 Volume 8 Issue 2, ECEG Conference Issue, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp83 - 235

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Abstract

Public agencies around the world are increasingly supplementing their service delivery channels with online services and continue to establish several policies and rules for improving service delivery. Such policies and rules are however based on customer oriented management paradigms without any consideration of complex customer interaction processes and staff experiences. Consequently, these policies and rules are deemed unrealistic and are often not picked up by employees. This paper reports on the synthesis of service delivery principles by employing a participative role playing game approach at a public agency. Service principles can be used to guide the design, implementation and execution of integrated service delivery. A role playing game refers to a research approach in which employees play a certain role and follow a script to simulate a range of customer interactions. Recognizing that customer experience is formed across several moments of contact with the agency through multiple channels, the game proved to be a useful instrument for both synthesizing principles and gaining bottom up commitment for embedding the principles within the public agency. We found that after the game, the employees that helped to synthesize the set of eight principles have also become active ambassadors for the principles within their respective departments.

 

Keywords: eGovernment, integrated service delivery, multi channel service delivery, gaming, role playing, principles

 

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Journal Article

Migration Strategies for Multi‑Channel Service Provisioning in Public Agencies  pp214-225

Anne Fleur van Veenstra, Marijn Janssen

© Dec 2010 Volume 8 Issue 2, ECEG Conference Issue, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp83 - 235

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Abstract

Many public agencies aim to realize better service delivery for citizens and businesses by implementing multi‑channel service provisioning (MCSP). MCSP coordinates service delivery channels to enable citizens and businesses to choose their preferred channel for their contact with the government. As the introduction of MCSP requires substantial organizational and technical change, organizations are in search of the right migration strategies. This study explores migration strategies for MCSP deployed in practice. We found that migration strategies for MCSP can be divided into two types: design and change management strategies. By looking at four case studies and evaluating the findings during an expert workshop, we found that organizations prefer a gradual migration process, as both step‑wise migration and the celebration of quick‑wins were often mentioned strategies. Furthermore, the strategy to implement MCSP starting in the front office was observed more often than starting in the back office, as the client needs were usually taken as a starting point for the migration. And finally we found that the public agencies under study consider having the right change management strategy in place more important than deploying the right design strategy.

 

Keywords: multi-channel service provisioning, MCSP, integrated service delivery, multi-channel management, migration strategies, change strategies, eGovernment

 

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Journal Article

Public Sector eService Development in Bangladesh: Status, Prospects and Challenges  pp15-29

M. Shakhawat Hossain Bhuiyan

© Sep 2011 Volume 9 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 92

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Abstract

Rapid development of information and communication technology (ICT) creates extensive opportunities for efficient and cost effective public service delivery. Even though most developed countries have had established electronic services for several years, the vast majority of developing countries have started only recently. In 2007, Bangladesh has also started to prioritise eService development in the national agenda e.g. dissemination of service information through websites, availability of official forms online, utility bill payment through mobile phone SMS and so on. There is as yet a lack of studies capturing the overall picture of such initiatives and progress in this country. Hence, the aim of this study is to examine various public eService development initiatives in Bangladesh, assess eService maturity level, and thereby assist the government to expedite implementation of those services. The study is based on both survey and interview approaches. A survey of 44 public officials, working on eGovernment implementation in different ministries and central public authorities, was conducted using a structured questionnaire. In addition, nine top‑level officials involved in ICT related government policy intervention were interviewed. A literature review covers theoretical tools on measuring and implementing eGovernment applications such as stage models to categorise eService maturity level. The survey and interview results aligned with a well‑known stage model are used to provided an overall picture of public eService initiatives in Bangladesh. The study has identified existing major eServices and assessed the overall maturity level of the services. The study also contributes by identifying prospects for public eService delivery in Bangladesh, including growing use of mobile phones and public private partnerships (PPP); while inadequate legal regulations, scarcity of power supply, insufficient initiatives by top‑level managements, service integrity and interoperability etc. are identified as challenges for the growth of public eService development and sustainability. Finally, the study also puts forward some recommendations to deal with major challenges.

 

Keywords: eService, electronic service, public service delivery, eGovernment application, interoperability, integrated service, Bangladesh

 

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Journal Article

The Practicality of Public Service Integration  pp94-109

Mohammed Alhusban

© Dec 2015 Volume 13 Issue 2, ECEG2015, Editor: Carl Adams, pp75 - 160

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Abstract

Abstract: The concept of public service integration constitutes the current tendency in the context of joined up government initiatives. Integration enables public agencies to share their objectives across organizational boundaries, whereby information an d services can be shared among ministries and government entities in a way that avoid data redundancy, boost up the efficiency of internal government processes, increase employeesâ ’ productivity and ultimately provide citizen with high quality services a nd better level of governmental interaction. Jordanian government is now challenged to deliver an expanding set of services to a growing number of constituents whose expectations are in increase. Recent geopolitical, economic, health and social conditions are rapidly changing on the landscape, and have been impacted by the surrounding political unrest, resulting in Jordanian government having to overstretch its capabilities and cope. In this paper, the practicality of integrating online public services is investigated from government employeeâ ’s views, in specific ministries for certain services. Licensing services have been considered in this paper, and that because those services have been flagged as the most commonly used online services by the study participants, and currently offered through several dispersed portals and service providers. The study aimed at answering questions related to the practicality of integrating public services in Jordan. Five areas have emerged as major themes in the contex t of this paper: The misconception of the definition of public service integration with electronic Government, Drivers and Barriers from intraorganisational view, the readiness and willingness towards integration, and potential services where integration may occur. The preliminary results emerged from this paper show that there is a necessity to push further in the public service integration process, especially for specific services that require the involvement of several service providers. Integrating he alth and social services have been highlight

 

Keywords: Keywords Public service integration, joined up service delivery, practical service public provision, collaborative government initiative, connected public service delivery

 

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Journal Article

Public Participation and Ethical Issues on E‑governance: A Study Perspective in Nepal  pp80-94

Gajendra Sharma, Xi Bao, Li Peng

© Nov 2014 Volume 12 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 125

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Abstract

Abstract: E‑governance is a way for governments to use the most innovative information and communication technologies (ICTs), to provide public and businesses with convenient access to government information and services, to improve the quality of the s ervices and to provide greater opportunities to participate in government activities. E‑government offers a huge movement to move forward with higher quality, cost‑effective, government services and a better relationship between people and government. Thi s paper investigates how public participant in e‑government can be enhanced in Nepal with ethical implementation of e‑government. A case study from e‑government context in Nepal was taken to study public participation, service delivery, challenges and eth ical issues. A policy network theory was applied on e‑governance policy‑making processes in the perspective of Nepal. The finding of the study was focused on good governance which includes issues of efficiency of service delivery, empowerment of citizens, transparency, and accountability. If applied effectively in developing countries like Nepal, e‑ government strategy can advance productivity in the public sector. The e‑government ethics may cover the rights and duties of bodies involved in the developme nt of information systems for public administration.

 

Keywords: Keywords: E-governance, public participation, e-participation, ethics, public service delivery

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 7 Issue 1 / Jan 2009  pp1‑122

Editor: Frank Bannister

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Keywords: accessibility, barriers, BRAIN, business process, business rule, capacity for getting ahead, citizen participation, community building, coping and sense making strategies, developing nations, digital divide, disability, disenfranchisement, eDemocracy, e-governance, e-Government adoption, e-government readiness, Egypt, end-user approaches, e-readiness, information and communication technology, information dissemination, internet voting, IT transfer, KedaiKom, Malaysia, municipalities, policy participation, political participation, public participation, public sector, public servants, Section 508, service delivery, social and digital inclusion, social consequences, social participation, strategic planning, Switzerland, technology acceptance model, Telecentres, turnout, websites

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 9 Issue 1 / Sep 2011  pp1‑92

Editor: Frank Bannister

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Editorial

Ships that Pass in the Night?

 

For some years now I have been involved in the PhD symposium at the European Group for Public Administration’s (EGPA’s) annual conference.  The majority of the PhD students attending these symposia are doing their research in public administration rather than e‑government, but sometimes ICT raises its head in unexpected situations.

 

This happened a few weeks ago at this year’s conference in Bucharest when a student was presenting some of the ongoing results from the COCOPS project.  Don’t worry about the acronym (www.eur.nl/cocops/ if you want to know more), COCOPS is an EU funded project which, inter alia is trying to evaluate the impact of various public sector reforms.  In the presentation in question, the student discussed and analysed various attempts to evaluate the impact of New Public Management (NPM) on public administration and citizens over the period from about the early 1990s to the present.

 

This coincides, give or take a year or two, with the period of the Internet and the Web in government.  So in the discussion afterwards I could not resist asking the obvious question: how are you (or COCOPS) going to differentiate the effect of NPM (or any other reform over this period) from the impact of technology?   This led to a lively discussion at the end of which there was no clear answer – possibly because distilling out such impacts is next to impossible.

 

The question of evaluating the impact of e‑government is one for another day.  My observation here is that the student, and one assumes that COCOPS team (and a very distinguished bunch they are), did not seem to have given this matter much, if any, thought.  Given that Eric Brynjolfsson is on record as claiming that almost all of the productivity gains in the US economy over the past 20 plus years are attributable to information technology, it seems a bit well, quixotic, to ignore the impact of the same technology in the public sector.  Quixotic maybe, but surprising no.  The world of public administration, or at least the academic end of it, is still, seemingly, largely oblivious of IT.  In fact the previous week at the eGov conference in Delft when I remarked at an IFIP meeting that the Oxford Handbook of Public Management had only two chapters which considered IT at all (and one of those was on IT in government by Helen Margretts) a leading American academic (whose identity I will protect though he has tenure) snorted on contemptuously that that was because public administration academics were still 30 years behind in their thinking.

 

A bit over the top maybe, but there a germ of truth in this accusation as there is in the sometimes heard counter accusation that too many people working in e‑government do not know enough about mainstream public administration, its concepts, theories and ideas.  A small number academics bridge this divide and many of them are to be found at EGPA each year, but it is a gap that really needs to be addressed by both sides.  Both public administration and e‑government worlds have much to learn from each other and if they could, there world would be the richer for it. 

 

Frank Bannister

September 2011

 

Keywords: CIO, local government, Mexico, IT organization, eService, electronic service, public service delivery, eGovernment application, interoperability, integrated service, Bangladesh, actor-network theory, eGovernment, eHealth, enterprise architecture, evolving structure, implementation, participatory budgeting, eDemocracy, Symfony, Quimby, open-source, eDem 1.0, software reuse, electronic PB, TQM, eGovernment, local government, organisational change, certification,

 

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