The Electronic Journal of e-Government publishes perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Government

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Journal Article

Networks of Communities and Communities of Networks in Online Government  pp115-129

Paul Henman, Rob Ackland, Tim Graham

© Dec 2014 Volume 12 Issue 2, ECEG 2014, Editor: Frank Banister, pp95 - 207

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Abstract

Abstract: Over the past decade the World Wide Web has become a core platform for the electronic operation of government. Yet the shape and nature of government presence on the Web and the online community in which it resides remains poorly understood and relatively under‑theorised. This paper analyses large‑scale web crawling data that map the hyperlink network structure between government websites and the broader Web ecology in the UK. In particular, it reports the communities of websites within a hype rlink network of over 19,000 websites and over 135,000 hyperlinks derived from 75 key UK government seed sites at national, regional (i.e. Scotland and Wales) and local government levels. These website communities were derived by utilising Infomap, a st ate‑of‑the‑art community detection algorithm that operate on the principle that flows of information in complex networks reveals community structure. Identifying and analysing online communities in which government websites reside provides insights in how hyperlink communities are arranged, that is, their emergent organizing principal and the importance of government in these online communities. It is hypothesized that online communities can occur around different policy topics (such as health, educati on or policing), or along institutional or jurisdictional boundaries (such as England, Scotland and Wales). Using this novel approach this paper demonstrates that communities emerge on both axes, and that social media and government portals are some of the most significant communities based on information flows. This research provides foundational knowledge about the role of government websites in the World Wide Web, the emergent online associations, and the changing dynamic of state information in the twenty‑first century. It points to strategies for developing government Web presence in networks that matter.

 

Keywords: Keywords: social network analysis, community detection, hyperlink networks, Infomap, web social science, UK

 

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Journal Article

Collaborative Network Analysis of two eGovernment Conferences: Are we Building a Community?  pp141-151

Nusa Erman, Ljupco Todorovski

© Dec 2011 Volume 9 Issue 2, ECEG, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp93 - 222

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Abstract

In the last two decades, eGovernment research maturated into an active scientific field with a number of publication venues, many of them taking form of regular annual conferences. In this paper, we address the central question of whether the active resea

 

Keywords: co-authorship network, scientific community, social network analysis

 

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