The Electronic Journal of e-Government publishes perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Government

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Journal Article

A Model of Success Factors for Implementing Local E‑government in Uganda  pp31-46

Robinah Nabafu, Gilbert Maiga

© Oct 2012 Volume 10 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 94

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Abstract

Local e‑government enables citizens at all levels to interact with government easily and access services through electronic means. It enables electronic transactions between government departments and the private sector to take place easily and cheaply. Despite these benefits, its implementation in economically and technologically transitioning countries remains problematic. This is largely due to the gap between the existing e‑government implementation models and the local context for these countries. This study attempts to address this problem by describing a model for local e‑government implementation in a transitioning country, Uganda. A field study was used to gather requirements for the model. The results are used to extend an existing model in order to describe a suitable one for Uganda. Basing on the results collected from the field, the research recommends that the extended model for local e‑government implementation should address the dimensions of financial Resource mobilization, ICT infrastructure, training, sensitization, trust and social political factors. The model was validated in a questionnaire based field study

 

Keywords: Electronic government, Local government, success factors, Transitional country, developing country, Traditional local government, e-government implementation models.

 

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Journal Article

A Model of Fundamental Components for an e‑Government Crowdsourcing Platform  pp141-156

Kevin Cupido, Jacques Ophoff

© Dec 2014 Volume 12 Issue 2, ECEG 2014, Editor: Frank Banister, pp95 - 207

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Abstract

Abstract: Most e‑Government implementations have resulted in failures with many implementations being one‑way (government‑to‑citizen) and mainly informational (Dada, 2006; Cloete, 2012). However, advances in technology provide governments with the opp ortunity to engage with citizens using new methods, such as crowdsourcing. Successful commercial and open source software implementations of crowdsourcing have sparked interest in its potential use in the public sector. Brabham (2009) advocated for the use of crowdsourcing in the public sector to increase public participation and for governments to access citizens as a source of ideas and solutions. However, crowdsourcing lacks a theoretical and conceptual foundation (Geiger, et al., 2011; Pedersen, et al., 2013). Within e‑Government there is also a lack of knowledge regarding the implementation of crowdsourcing platforms (Koch & Brunswicker, 2011). The main research questions is: How are crowdsourcing initiatives able to motivate citizen participat ion in e‑Government? A conceptual model of critical success factors for an e‑Government crowdsourcing solution is presented, based on a comprehensive review of relevant literature. The model uses Self‑Determination Theory as a basis to examine citizen mo tivation and the influence of incentives or rewards. The model also addresses system factors such as task clarity and types, management, and feedback. In addition it also examines effort and performance expectancy, and behavioural intention to use crowdso urcing through the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology. The results of a questionnaire‑based survey (n=295) testing the model indicated that some crowdsourcing concepts may not necessarily translate well when applied in public sector init iatives. System management and support, rules and feedback as well as the UTUAT constructs were identified as important factors. This research benefits future work by building a conceptual foundation for a potential e‑Government crowdsourcing solution.

 

Keywords: Keywords: e-Government, Crowdsourcing, Critical Success Factors, Self-Determination Theory

 

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Journal Article

Success Factors of Geneva's e‑Voting System  pp71-78

Michel Chevallier, Michel Warynski, Alain Sandoz

© Dec 2006 Volume 4 Issue 2, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp49 - 94

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Abstract

In eight official votes between January 2003 and April 2005 authorities in Geneva invited up to 90 ,000 citizens to test a remote e‑Voting system as a complement to traditional voting methods. Multidisciplinary teams composed of legal, political, PR, security and computer science specialists, strongly supported by the Government, participated in creating the system which will be appraised by the Geneva Parliament en 2006. This paper reports on the project, its results in terms of numbers and socio‑political profile of e‑Voters, and its success factors. All three authors were directly or indirectly involved in the project from the beginning and are currently working on the deployment of Geneva's e‑ Government platform.

 

Keywords: remote e-voting, direct democracy, project success factors

 

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