The Electronic Journal of e-Government publishes perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Government

For general enquiries email administrator@ejeg.com

Click here to see other Scholarly Electronic Journals published by API
For a range of research text books on this and complimentary topics visit the Academic Bookshop

Information about the European Conference on Digital Government is available here

 

Journal Article

Understanding Citizen's Continuance Intention to Use e‑Government Website: a Composite View of Technology Acceptance Model and Computer Self‑Efficacy  pp55-64

Sivaporn Wangpipatwong, Wichian Chutimaskul, Borworn Papasratorn

© Apr 2008 Volume 6 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 64

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

This study aims to understand the fundamental factors influencing the citizen's continuance intention to use e‑ Government websites by using the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) as a based theoretical model. Computer self‑ efficacy is adopted as an additional factor that influences the citizen's continuance intention to use e‑Government websites. To empirically test the proposed research model, the web‑based survey was employed. The participants consisted of 614 country‑wide citizens with at least a bachelor's degree and an experience with e‑Government websites. Regression analysis was conducted to test the model. The results revealed that perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use of e‑Government websites and citizen's computer self‑efficacy directly enhanced citizen's continuance intention to use e‑Government websites. In addition, perceived ease of use of e‑Government websites indirectly enhanced citizen's continuance intention through perceived usefulness.

 

Keywords: e-Government, technology acceptance model, computer self-efficacy, continuance intention

 

Share |

Journal Article

e‑Government and Technology Acceptance: The Case of the Implementation of Section 508 Guidelines for Websites  pp87-98

Paul T. Jaeger, Miriam Matteson

© Jan 2009 Volume 7 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 122

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

This paper examines the relevance of the Technology Acceptance Model for e‑Government websites at federal government level in the United States through an exploratory research study. Various unfunded government mandates over the past several years have required agencies to create websites, put services on the sites, and make them accessible to citizens, and the federal e‑Government now includes tens of thousands of sites. Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act, for example, was passed to ensure e‑Government sites would be accessible to persons with disabilities. By studying the implementation of the requirements of Section 508 through a number of data collection techniques and in terms of the Technology Acceptance Model, this paper seeks to use this particular law as an example through which to better understand the processes by which government agencies adopt e‑Government requirements and the actions that government managers can take to improve the implementation of such adoption.

 

Keywords: e-Government, technology acceptance model, accessibility, Section 508, disability, public servants, websites

 

Share |

Journal Article

Conceptualising Citizen's Trust in e‑Government: Application of Q Methodology  pp295-310

Hisham Alsaghier, Marilyn Ford, Anne Nguyen, Rene Hexel

© Dec 2009 Volume 7 Issue 4, ECEG 2009, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp295 - 432

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

In e‑government context, trust plays a vital role in helping citizens overcome perceived risks. Trust makes citizens comfortable sharing personal information, make online government transaction, and acting on e‑ Government advices. Thus, trust is a significant notion that should be critically investigated to help both researchers and practitioners to understand citizens' acceptance to e‑Government. Prior research in trust has focused mainly on consumer's trust in e‑Commerce. Most of existing literatures on trust in e‑government focus on technical perspective such as PKI. This paper contributes by proposing a conceptual model of citizens' trust in e‑ Government. The proposed conceptual model of citizens' trust in e‑government is integrated constructs from multiple disciplines: psychology, sociology, e‑commerce, and HCI. The research is aimed also to develop items in order to measure the theoretical constructs in the proposed model. The pool of items is generated based on literature review. Q‑Methodology has been utilised to validate the generated measurement items. The outcome of two Q‑sorting rounds resulted in developing a survey instrument for proposed model with an excellent validity and reliability statistical results.

 

Keywords: e-government, trust, perceived risk, citizens' participation, technology acceptance model

 

Share |

Journal Article

The Acceptance of the e‑Filing System by Malaysian Taxpayers: A Simplified Model  pp23-32

Anna Che Azmi, Ng Lee Bee

© Mar 2010 Volume 8 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 82

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

The e‑filing system is an important e‑government service in Malaysia. This paper investigates the factors that lead to the acceptance of e‑filing among taxpayers by using TAM. This study proposes a model consisting of three constructs, which are perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use and perceived risk. The model proposed by this study is a simpler model compared to other studies on e‑filing. The confirmatory factor analysis shows that the model is an adequate fit. Based on the data collected from 166 respondents, the results showed that the proposed model explained up to 61% of the variance in behavioral intention. All of the variables significantly influence behavioral intention. The perceived risk construct has a negative association with the perceived usefulness construct. However, there is no significant association between the perceived risk and perceived ease of use constructs.

 

Keywords: taxation, e-filing, technology acceptance model, perceived risk, e-government, Malaysia

 

Share |

Journal Article

The Role of National Culture on Citizen Adoption of eGovernment services: An Empirical Study  pp93-106

Omar Al-Hujran, Mahmoud Al-dalahmeh, Anas Aloudat

© Dec 2011 Volume 9 Issue 2, ECEG, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp93 - 222

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Increasingly governments around the world have realized the imperative of providing the public with not only improved government information and services but also improved public governance, transparency and accountability through eGovernment services. However, many governments still face the problem of low level adoption of eGovernment websites. It is because the issue of eGovernment adoption is complex and multi‑dimensional in nature. In consequence, it must be carefully addressed not only from technological perspectives but also from social, cultural, and organizational perspectives. The business case for developing sustainable successful eGovernment initiatives critically depends on our knowledge and understanding of how to increase citizen adoption of eGovernment websites. A review of the literature, however, shows that much of extant eGovernment research has focused on eGovernment adoption in developed countries. In consequence, little is known about national cultural factors that may influence eGovernment adoption in developing countries. This knowledge gap is particularly apparent in Jordan. Therefore, the objective of this paper is to examine national cultural factors that may influence citizen adoption of eGovernment websites in this culturally different part of the world. We developed an integrated model by extending the technology acceptance model (TAM) with Hofstede’s national culture dimensions, which is used to evaluate the impact of national culture on eGovernment adoption in this paper. Based on survey data collected from a total of 197 Jordanian citizens, evidence shows that while two cultural dimensions: power distance and uncertainty avoidance had significant impacts on citizens' intention to adopt eGovernment, the other three cultural dimensions: individualism, masculinity, and long‑term orientation had no discernible impacts. The results also indicate that perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, attitude are significant indicators of citizens’ intention to use state government services online.

 

Keywords: eGovernment adoption, technology acceptance model, culture, Jordan

 

Share |

Journal Article

E‑government and Technological Utopianism: Exploring Zambia’s Challenges and Opportunities  pp16-30

Kelvin Joseph Bwalya, Saul Floyd Zulu, Balulwami Grand, Peter M. Sebina

© Oct 2012 Volume 10 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 94

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

This article presents an empirical study that was conducted in three towns (Lusaka, Livingstone and Kitwe) in Zambia to ascertain the awareness of citizens about the anticipated value that e‑government adds to public service provision. Awareness entails that citizens are able to identify the opportunities that e‑government has to offer in the delivery of public services. Using a Mixed Methods Research (MMR) approach, the study measured the perception of citizens on the overall e‑government agenda. Spearman’s rho was used to determine concurrent and construct validity of the data collection instruments. Restricted factor analysis with Kaiser Normalization identified eight predictor factors explaining 23 percent of the variance in the model indicating acceptance and/or awareness of e‑government applications. The results of the research indicate that with the likelihood of a majority of citizens aware of and utilising e‑government once it is globally rolled out, there are chances that e‑government may positively impact on the bureaucratic nature of government and ultimately improve public service delivery in Zambia. Further, this research suggests there are encouraging indications for effective development of e‑government in Zambia. The limitation of the study is that the sampled population may not be statistically representative of the general population in Zambia and therefore it is not possible to generalise the outcomes of this research.

 

Keywords: e-government, Zambia, service efficiency, corruption, technology acceptance, e-Participation, e-Inclusiveness

 

Share |

Journal Article

Organizational Adaptation to Sustain Information Technology: The Case of E‑Government in Developing Countries  pp70-83

Nurdin Nurdin, Rosemary Stockdale, Helana Scheepers

© Oct 2012 Volume 10 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 94

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Increasingly governments around the world have realized the imperative of providing the public with not only improved government information and services but also improved public governance, transparency and accountability through eGovernment services. Ho

 

Keywords: eGovernment adoption, technology acceptance model, culture, Jordan

 

Share |

Journal Article

Electronic Tax Filing in the United States: An Analysis of Possible Success factors  pp20-36

Sonja E. Pippin, Mehmet S. Tosun

© Nov 2014 Volume 12 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 125

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Abstract: This study summarizes and analyses the demographic, socio‑economic, and geographic factors affecting electronic tax filing (e‑filing) in the United States for the years 1999, and 2004…2007 and the growth in e‑filing between 1999 and 2007. Beyo nd the descriptive analysis, two issues related to electronic tax filing are target of further analysis: First, the variables having a positive impact on e‑filing rates and e‑filing growth are analysed. Second, because a more detailed look at state and co unty data indicates high variability within and between states, some demographic, socio‑economic, and geographic variables are examined in more detail. This second question addresses the possibility that e‑filing … just like other initiatives involving el ectronic media … could increase the digital gap. We use zip‑code level e‑filing information and county level demographic, income and unemployment data for each of the years in question. Our findings indicate significant variation in e‑filing rates across and within states, and rapid growth over time. E‑filing rates are found to be lower in rural counties, counties with low population size, counties with a lower share of females, counties with a higher share of Hispanics and Asians, and counties with a hig her share of the elderly population. Surprisingly, educational attainment is negatively correlated with e‑filing rate and growth in e‑filing.

 

Keywords: Keywords: e-government, electronic tax filing rates, electronic tax filing growth, technology acceptance, socio-economic, demographic, and geographic factors

 

Share |