The Electronic Journal of e-Government publishes perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Government

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Journal Article

A Review of e‑Government Research as a Mature Discipline: Trends, Themes, Philosophies, Methodologies, and Methods  pp18-35

Muhammad Yusuf, Carl Adams, Kate Dingley

© Jun 2016 Volume 14 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 134

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Abstract

Abstract: This paper aims to identify themes, trends, research philosophies, methodologies and methods used in E‑Government studies. This research uses a novel structure literature review method to capture the evolving research focus in the E‑Government l iterature. It examines all abstracts from the European Conference on E‑Government (ECEG) papers from 2007 to 2012 and International Conference on E‑Government (ICEG) papers from 2007 to 2010. This paper also compares previous research covering themes and models of E‑Government research. The research findings are: 1) case study and potential case study is dominant methods, 2) there are various research philosophy, methodology and methods on e‑government field, and 3) e‑government is evolving over ti me and is maturing as a discipline. An analysis also shows lack of works covering development of theory in e‑government domain. This paper provides further contribution by using a novel approach for conducting a structured literature review, based on eval uating abstracts and key words, and in a corresponding method to method to validate classification of themes that emerge using focus group discussion sessions.

 

Keywords: Keywords: e-government, themes, trends, philosophy, methodology, method, literature review, ICEG, ECEG

 

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Journal Article

Online Social Networking, Order and Disorder  pp228-239

Russell Lock, Louise Cooke, Tom jackson

© Dec 2013 Volume 11 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp181 - 322

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Abstract

Abstract: Whilst online social networking has been used successfully for many years by all strata of the worlds population, its use to ferment and prevent civil disturbances is a relatively new phenomenon. It is clear that the way in which online social networking sites are being used is evolving, and that changing user perceptions of online privacy may impact on the ability of the law enforcement community to adapt to new methods of monitoring and evidence gathering. This paper focuses primarily on the London riots of August 2011, and as such discusses legal issues from a UK perspective. However, the matters discussed are of relevance worldwide, with reference made to similar events outside the UK, to show that what occurred in London was not an isolate d incident, or a quirk of the UK social networking scene. This paper explores what occurred, the platforms that were used and how they were used, and the legal framework in which investigations took place. It examines the use of social networking to organ ise rioters, support community defence, and shape the response of law enforcement agencies such as the police, government and the courts. It concludes that there is significant potential for problems of this type to occur in the future, which will require the evolution of law enforcement methods and procedures, and could change the way in which the law enforcement community utilise e‑Government systems

 

Keywords: Keywords: Social Networking, Law Enforcement, London Riots, Future Trends

 

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