The Electronic Journal of e-Government publishes perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Government

For general enquiries email administrator@ejeg.com

Click here to see other Scholarly Electronic Journals published by API
For a range of research text books on this and complimentary topics visit the Academic Bookshop

Information about the European Conference on Digital Government is available here

 

Journal Article

Bringing Confidence to Electronic Voting  pp14-21

Andreu Riera, Paul Brown

© Mar 2003 Volume 1 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 62

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Electronic voting (whether it is remote or poll‑site) has a lack of transparency that makes its use controversial. Currently there is a lively debate regarding the deployment of electronic voting systems, with people arguing whether trustworthiness is only achievable by means of the use of backup paper trails. We believe that paper trails are not strictly necessary. In our opinion, the lack of transparency of electronic voting systems can be overcome to a great extent by using adequate security measures (technological, physical and procedural). Such security measures would provide clarity to the process and avoid the need to rely on complex and/or networked systems and/or proprietary closed systems.

 

Keywords: electronic voting, security, trust, e-Democracy

 

Share |

Journal Article

Attaining Social Value from Electronic Government  pp31-42

Michael Grimsley, Anthony Meehan

© Apr 2008 Volume 6 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 64

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

We define and elaborate a Social Value framework supporting evaluation and attainment of the broader socio‑political and socio‑economic goals that characterise many electronic government initiatives. The key elements of the framework are the willingness of citizens to (positively) recommend an e‑Government service to others, based upon personal trust in the service provider, and personal experience of the service, based upon experience of service provision and outcomes. The validity of the framework is explored through an empirical quantitative study of citizens' experiences of a newly introduced e‑Government system to allocate public social housing. The results of this study include evidence of generic antecedents of trust and willingness to recommend, pointing the way to more general applicability of the framework for designers and managers of electronic government systems.

 

Keywords: electronic government, social value, public value, recommendation, trust, evaluation

 

Share |

Journal Article

Remodelled and Restyled e‑Procurement — New Power Relationships Down Under  pp183-194

John Douglas Thomson

© Apr 2009 Volume 7 Issue 2, ECEG 2007, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp123 - 208

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

This paper analyses the way in which a major public sector organisation undertakes its high tech e‑ procurements and its power relationships at the interface with its private sector suppliers. This is undertaken by examining the corporate governance of significant high tech e‑procurements by the Australian Department of Defence. Comparative case study data of 106 e‑procurements were undertaken by the author over the key client development period from concept to contract award, with a view to determining 'best practice' e‑procurement process. The best practice model links technological developments with e‑procurement power frameworks, and provides a public sector client with knowledge to realize new power relationships at the publicprivate interface through the remodelling and restyling of its e‑procurement arrangements.

 

Keywords: e-governance, e-transactions, e-procurement, e-transparency, e-trust, e-project management

 

Share |

Journal Article

Conceptualising Citizen's Trust in e‑Government: Application of Q Methodology  pp295-310

Hisham Alsaghier, Marilyn Ford, Anne Nguyen, Rene Hexel

© Dec 2009 Volume 7 Issue 4, ECEG 2009, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp295 - 432

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

In e‑government context, trust plays a vital role in helping citizens overcome perceived risks. Trust makes citizens comfortable sharing personal information, make online government transaction, and acting on e‑ Government advices. Thus, trust is a significant notion that should be critically investigated to help both researchers and practitioners to understand citizens' acceptance to e‑Government. Prior research in trust has focused mainly on consumer's trust in e‑Commerce. Most of existing literatures on trust in e‑government focus on technical perspective such as PKI. This paper contributes by proposing a conceptual model of citizens' trust in e‑ Government. The proposed conceptual model of citizens' trust in e‑government is integrated constructs from multiple disciplines: psychology, sociology, e‑commerce, and HCI. The research is aimed also to develop items in order to measure the theoretical constructs in the proposed model. The pool of items is generated based on literature review. Q‑Methodology has been utilised to validate the generated measurement items. The outcome of two Q‑sorting rounds resulted in developing a survey instrument for proposed model with an excellent validity and reliability statistical results.

 

Keywords: e-government, trust, perceived risk, citizens' participation, technology acceptance model

 

Share |

Journal Article

The Adoption of the Traffic Violation E‑payment System (TVEPS) of Kuwait  pp1-19

A Omar E M. Khalil, Alaa Al„Nasrallah

© Nov 2014 Volume 12 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 125

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Abstract: E‑government (e‑gov) has become indispensable for government modernization. Its success, however, is contingent upon its adoption by the intended users. This research used an extended version of the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Tech nology (UTAUT) model to investigate a number of factors that are believed to affect the Kuwaiti citizens adoption of the traffic violation e‑payment system (TVEPS). Effort expectancy and social influence were found to influence the use intention, and users Internet experience moderated such a relationship. However, performance expectancy did not influence the intention to use TVEPS. Facilitating condition, trust and use intention were found to influence the actual use of the system. While gender mod erated the relationship between facilitating conditions and actual use of the system, awareness moderated the relationship of trust and use intention with the actual use of the system. These findings and their implications are further discussed in the pap er.

 

Keywords: Keywords: UTAUT, e-government, Effort Expectancy, Performance Expectancy, Social Influence, Facilitating Conditions, Trust, Kuwait

 

Share |

Journal Article

Ethical Problems for e‑Government: An Evaluative Framework  pp179-188

Hilary Mullen, David Sanford Horner

© Oct 2004 Volume 2 Issue 3, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp147 - 218

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

This paper assesses the assertion that there is a lack of well understood and developed rules and models for ethical behaviour in e‑Government. A framework is proposed to evaluate the extent to which types of moral wrongdoing are related specifically to the technologies used. It identifies four categories of ethical issues: those related to electronic environments; those dependent on electronic environments; those determined by electronic environments; and those specific to electronic environments. Furthermore, it suggests the policy perspectives, which governments may need to consider.

 

Keywords: e-Government Democracy Ethics Information and Communication Technology Trust

 

Share |

Journal Article

Communication and Culture: Designing a Knowledge‑enabled Environment to Effect Local Government Reform  pp159-168

Vivien Reid, Barbara Bardzki, Stephen McNamee

© Oct 2004 Volume 2 Issue 3, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp147 - 218

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Knowledge sharing processes and an appropriate infrastructure are key elements to successful Knowledge Management (KM) initiatives but culture is paramount. In a public sector context, where organisational structures tend to be hierarchical and complex, implementing effective KM is a difficult task. Central to the success of such initiatives are culture, trust, loyalty or solidarity and a supportive communication climate.

 

Keywords: knowledge local government culture communication trust

 

Share |

Journal Article

Trustworthy Communication Channels for the Electronic Safe  pp93-103

Christian Breitenstrom, Martin Unger, Andreas Penski

© Dec 2010 Volume 8 Issue 2, ECEG Conference Issue, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp83 - 235

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

The transition from the traditional task oriented delivery of single government services to a process‑oriented delivery of well sized service bundles is common for modern eGovernment implementations. Concerning the European Services Directive (DIRECTIVE 2006/123/EC) these service bundles are tailored to cover the needs of companies trying to offer their services in other EU member states. Nevertheless this approach is applicable to many other life circumstances. As process oriented service chains require well suited data capture and data sharing mechanisms, the Electronic Safe as a fundamental eGovernment infrastructure comes into play. The Electronic Safe is seen from a citizens viewpoint as a unique instrument, that makes it easy to control data flows between the citizen and her communication partners in a trustworthy and privacy conserving way. Previous work showed how to implement such a critical infrastructure in a decentralized and distributed manner, to satisfy strong confidentiality and privacy requirements. This paper focuses on the ability to bind the functionality of the Electronic Safe to the trustworthiness of its underlying hardware and software stack including its secure communication channels. We show how to use the mutual attestation mechanisms designed by the Trusted Computing Group (TCG) with the Safe Infrastructure and their communication protocols, while keeping the privacy features that the Safe Owner appreciates.

 

Keywords: trusted computing, electronic safe, privacy enhancing technology

 

Share |