The Electronic Journal of e-Government publishes perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Government

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Journal Article

Integrating the IT Infrastructures in Healthcare Organisations: a Proposition of Influential Factors  pp27-36

Khalil Khoumbati, Marinos Themistocleous

© Dec 2006 Volume 4 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 48

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Abstract

The healthcare industry is composed of primary and secondary healthcare providers. Each provider needs to exchange information with other providers. Information Systems (IS) developed on different types of hardware and software platforms serve this need. Due to the heterogeneous and distributed nature of information and communicating technology (ICT) in the healthcare industry, sharing of the data has become an issue. There is an urgent need for the integration of these distributed IS. Several efforts have been made to achieve the integration, but traditional methods can only in part address integration problems. Enterprise Application Integration (EAI) offers another solution to addressing the needs of healthcare information systems integration. From a technical perspective, EAI overcomes integration problems at all levels (e.g. data, process etc.) by providing a flexible and manageable Information Technology (IT) infrastructure. From a business perspective, EAI reduces the overall integration costs by minimising integration time and maintenance cost. A literature review in the area of EAI indicates that EAI adoption has not been studied in depth in relation to healthcare organisations. However, there is a clear need for healthcare organisations to seek EAI adoption. In doing so, a conceptual framework for EAI adoption in healthcare organisations is proposed. Decision makers in healthcare organisations, can use this model when considering EAI adoption.

 

Keywords: Healthcare organisations, adoption, and Enterprise Application Integration

 

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Journal Article

Factors for Successful e‑Government Adoption: a Conceptual Framework  pp63-76

Vinod Kumar, Bhasker Mukerji, Irfan Butt

© Aug 2007 Volume 5 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 95

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Abstract

Canada has been the world's leader in e‑Government maturity for the last five years. The global average for government website usage by citizens is about 30%. In Canada, this statistic is over 51%. The vast majority of Canadians visit government websites to obtain information, rather than interacting or transacting with the government. It seems that the rate of adoption of e‑Government has globally fallen below expectations although some countries are doing better than others. Clearly, a better understanding of why and how citizens use government websites, and their general dispositions towards e‑Government is an important research issue. This paper initiates discussion of this issue by proposing a conceptual model of e‑Government adoption that places users as the focal point for e‑Government adoption strategy.

 

Keywords: customer orientation, e-Government, adoption, model, Canada

 

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Journal Article

Examining the Barriers to e‑Government Adoption  pp113-122

Richard W. Schwester

© Jan 2009 Volume 7 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 122

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Abstract

e‑Government initially began as process where government entities developed websites and began populating these sites with information. After mastering this information dissemination aspect, government units moved toward processing online transactions. Subsequent to mastering transaction processing, governments moved across a continuum and engaged citizens online in a participatory framework; that is, offering Internet applications that connect citizens with public administrators, decision‑makers, and perhaps elected officials. While the subsequent progression and potential benefits of e‑Government applications are without limits, there are a number of barriers that impede the implementation of such applications. Using survey data collected by the International CityCounty Management Association (ICMA), this paper examines the factors that most impede the adoption of e‑Government applications. Central research questions include: what are the differences between municipalities that have comprehensive e‑ Government platforms and those that do not, and to what extent do certain barriers explain these differences? Multiple regression results indicate that e‑Government adoption is a function of financial, technical, and human resources. Holding all other factors constant, municipalities with higher operating budgets, more full‑time IT staff, and technical resources are more likely to implement a comprehensive e‑Government platform. Political support is a key and fairly robust determinant of municipal e‑Government adoption as well.

 

Keywords: e-Government adoption, municipalities, barriers, service delivery, information dissemination, citizen participation

 

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Journal Article

Harnessing e‑Government Adoption in the SADC Region: a Conceptual Underpinning  pp13-22

Kelvin Joseph Bwalya, Mike Healy

© Mar 2010 Volume 8 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 82

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Abstract

There has recently been an escalation of e‑Government initiatives in the Southern African Development Community (SADC) region, with South Africa, Mauritius, Seychelles and Botswana leading the way towards this cause. Evidence indicates e‑Government implementation projects in this region either fail or succeed. Therefore it is important that before actual implementation is commissioned, there is need to understand the different challenges that come with e‑Government implementations such as investment risks, failure to be adopted by the general citizenry, abandoning already‑commissioned e‑Government activities, and so forth. uch problems can be avoided by putting in place a properly and carefully authored e‑Government adoption strategy that takes care of the local context and the multi‑dimensionality of e‑Government. This paper, with strong reference to Davis' 1989 Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) theoretical underpinning, proposes a conceptual e‑Government adoption model that may be commensurate with promoting the growth of e‑ Government in the SADC region. However, the limitation of this proposed model is that it has not been empirically tested and leaves room for its further validation. The paper follows up on the status of e‑Government implementation in the SADC region by presenting two case studies that detail what interventions and initiatives have been put in place to encourage e‑Government in Botswana and Zambia.

 

Keywords: e-government policies, adoption model, Zambia, Botswana, SADC

 

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Journal Article

Factors Influencing Citizen Adoption of SMS‑Based e‑Government Services  pp55-70

Tony Dwi Susantoand Robert Goodwin

© Mar 2010 Volume 8 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 82

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Abstract

This paper identifies the factors that determine citizens' acceptance of SMS‑based e‑government services. It reports on a web‑based survey, paper‑based questionnaires, and phone‑call interviews that collected 159 responses from 25 countries. The results indicate that there are fifteen perceptions toward using SMS‑based e‑government services that may influence citizens to use or to reject the services: perceived ease of use; perceived efficiency in time and distance; perceived value for money; perceived usefulness; perceived responsiveness; perceived convenience; perceived relevance, quality and reliability of the information; trust in the SMS technology; perceived risk to user privacy; perceived reliability of the mobile network and the SMS‑based system; trust in government and perceived quality of public services; perceived risk to money; perceived availability of device and infrastructure; perceived compatibility; and perceived self‑efficacy in using SMS. Whether or not a citizen adopts an SMS‑based e‑government service is influenced by these perceptions. To increase the acceptance of SMS‑based e‑government services, the systems should address all of these belief factors. An intensive advertising campaign for the services in all mass media channels is critically important to make citizens aware of and to provide detailed knowledge about the services. The advertising campaign should involve people who influence individuals' decision making. These people include friends, family, teachers, experts, public figures, and government officials. This study found that Notification services are the most frequently used followed by Pull SMS, Listen, and Transaction SMS services. Notification services could be an appropriate starting point for governments who want to establish SMS‑based e‑government services.

 

Keywords: e-government, SMS, acceptance factors, six Level model of SMS-based e-government, technology adoption, users' behaviour, public services

 

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Journal Article

Exploring Issues Underlying Citizen Adoption of eGovernment Initiatives in Developing Countries: The Case of Tanzania  pp175-187

Jim Yonazi, Henk Sol, Albert Boonstra

© Dec 2010 Volume 8 Issue 2, ECEG Conference Issue, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp83 - 235

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Abstract

Adoption plays an important role in the success of eGovernment initiatives. Low adoption, particularly by citizens, indicates inadequate utilization and rejection of the initiatives by the intended users. This may lead into failure of eGovernment initiatives. This is particularly important in the context of developing countries such as Tanzania where eGovernment is a newly imported innovation. It is therefore imperative to understand and proactively consider issues underlying citizen adoption of eGovernment initiatives in that context. This study aimed at identifying issues underlying adoption of eGovernment initiatives in Tanzania, a typical developing country. The results are important for designing, deploying, and evaluating of the initiatives in the country. In this paper, we present research results concerning issues influencing adoption of eGovernment initiatives by citizens in Tanzania. Using the case study approach as our strategy, we investigated the adoption of three government organisations. We found that the adoption of eGovernment initiatives in Tanzania is determined by (1) perceived organisational preparedness (2) citizen preparedness (3) service intrinsic issues, (4) access limitations, and (5) organisational context. We perceive that it is possible to achieve higher degree of citizen adoption of eGovernment initiatives in Tanzania. However, the government need appropriate strategies to overcome challenges posed by the issues identified in this study.

 

Keywords: eGovernment, Tanzania, adoption, Africa, developing countries

 

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Journal Article

The Role of National Culture on Citizen Adoption of eGovernment services: An Empirical Study  pp93-106

Omar Al-Hujran, Mahmoud Al-dalahmeh, Anas Aloudat

© Dec 2011 Volume 9 Issue 2, ECEG, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp93 - 222

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Abstract

Increasingly governments around the world have realized the imperative of providing the public with not only improved government information and services but also improved public governance, transparency and accountability through eGovernment services. However, many governments still face the problem of low level adoption of eGovernment websites. It is because the issue of eGovernment adoption is complex and multi‑dimensional in nature. In consequence, it must be carefully addressed not only from technological perspectives but also from social, cultural, and organizational perspectives. The business case for developing sustainable successful eGovernment initiatives critically depends on our knowledge and understanding of how to increase citizen adoption of eGovernment websites. A review of the literature, however, shows that much of extant eGovernment research has focused on eGovernment adoption in developed countries. In consequence, little is known about national cultural factors that may influence eGovernment adoption in developing countries. This knowledge gap is particularly apparent in Jordan. Therefore, the objective of this paper is to examine national cultural factors that may influence citizen adoption of eGovernment websites in this culturally different part of the world. We developed an integrated model by extending the technology acceptance model (TAM) with Hofstede’s national culture dimensions, which is used to evaluate the impact of national culture on eGovernment adoption in this paper. Based on survey data collected from a total of 197 Jordanian citizens, evidence shows that while two cultural dimensions: power distance and uncertainty avoidance had significant impacts on citizens' intention to adopt eGovernment, the other three cultural dimensions: individualism, masculinity, and long‑term orientation had no discernible impacts. The results also indicate that perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, attitude are significant indicators of citizens’ intention to use state government services online.

 

Keywords: eGovernment adoption, technology acceptance model, culture, Jordan

 

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Journal Article

Organizational Adaptation to Sustain Information Technology: The Case of E‑Government in Developing Countries  pp70-83

Nurdin Nurdin, Rosemary Stockdale, Helana Scheepers

© Oct 2012 Volume 10 Issue 1, Editor: Frank Bannister, pp1 - 94

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Abstract

Increasingly governments around the world have realized the imperative of providing the public with not only improved government information and services but also improved public governance, transparency and accountability through eGovernment services. Ho

 

Keywords: eGovernment adoption, technology acceptance model, culture, Jordan

 

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