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Journal Issue
Volume 5 Issue 2, ECEG 2007 / Dec 2007  pp95‑224

Editor: Frank Bannister

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Turkish Local e‑Governments: a Longitudinal Study  pp95‑106

Aykut Arslan

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e‑Democracy in Australia: the Challenge of Evolving a Successful Model  pp107‑116

Jenny Backhouse

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Verification and Validation Issues in Electronic Voting  pp117‑126

Orhan Cetinkaya, Deniz Cetinkaya

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Trust and the Taxman: a Study of the Irish Revenue's Website Service Quality  pp127‑134

Regina Connolly

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Long‑term Digital Archiving — Outsourcing or Doing it  pp135‑144

Mitja Decman

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Governmental Collaboration and Infrastructural Standards in Belgium  pp145‑152

Alea Fairchild, Bruno de Vuyst

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Evaluating Web Service Composition Methods: the Need for Including Multi‑Actor Elements  pp153‑164

Ralph W. Feenstra, Marijn Janssen, René W. Wagenaar

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Mypage and Borger.dk — A Case Study of Two Government Service Web Portals  pp165‑176

Karin Furuli, Sigrun Kongsrud

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Oxygen Government Practices  pp177‑190

Mary Griffiths

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A Model for Document Management in e‑Government Systems Based on Hierarchical Process Folders  pp191‑204

Raphael Kunis, Gudula Rünger, Michael Schwind

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e‑Voting: Same Pilots, Same Problems, Different Agendas  pp205‑212

Mark Liptrott

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Abstract

This paper outlines the preliminary findings of the empirical stage of the research to establish the reasons that in 2003 some English local authorities decided to trial e‑voting and others did not. The key findings demonstrate that central and local governments have different agendas and there is little momentum from central government to increase the number of pilot schemes. The central government policy to introduce e‑voting via voluntary pilot schemes is only providing a limited insight into the problems surrounding the operation of the new voting methods. The findings are derived from comparative semi‑structured interviews with Election Officers from pilot and non‑pilot authorities, and the analysis is based upon Rogers' diffusion of innovations theory framework. The findings illustrate that in the case of e‑voting, central government has not adopted a formal diffusion strategy and that a most influential driver to adopt e‑voting is not prominently acknowledged in diffusion theory. The results suggest that the theory of perceived attributes needs modification and the issue of the diffusion of a public policy should be considered by government earlier in the public policy process. 

 

Keywords: e-voting, pilot scheme, public policy process, diffusion

 

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Digitization and Political Accountability in the USA and the Netherlands: Convergence or Reproduction of Differences?  pp213‑224

Albert Meijer

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